Upper Limb Movement Modelling for Adaptive and Personalised Physical Rehabilitation in Virtual Reality

Student thesis: Doctoral Thesis

Abstract

Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability with over three-quarters of patients experiencing an upper limb impairment varying in severity. Early, intense, and frequent physical rehabilitation is important for quicker recovery of the upper limbs and the prevention of further deterioration of their upper limb impairment. Rehabilitation begins almost immediately at the hospital. Once released from the hospital it is intended that patients continue their rehabilitation program at home supported by a community stroke team. However, there are two main barriers to rehabilitation continuing effectively at this stage. The first is limited contact with a physiotherapist or occupational therapist to guide and support an intensive rehabilitation programme. The second is that conventional rehabilitation is tough to maintain immediately after stroke due to fatigue, lack of concentration, depression and other effects. Stroke patients can find exercises monotonous and tiring, and a lack of motivation can result in patients failing to engage fully with their treatment. Lack of participation in prescribed rehabilitation exercises may affect recovery or cause deterioration of mobility.

This thesis examines the hypothesis that upper limb stroke rehabilitation can be made more accessible and enjoyable through the use of modern commercial virtual reality (VR) hardware, with personalised models of user hand motion adapted to user capability over time, and VR games with tasks that utilise natural hand gestures as input controls to execute personalised physical rehabilitation exercises. To support the investigation of this hypothesis a novel adaptive, gamebased, virtual reality (VR) rehabilitation system has been designed and developed for self-managed rehabilitation. Hands are tracked using a Leap Motion Controller, with hand movements and gestures used as in input controller for VR tasks. A user-centred design methodology was adopted, and the final version of the system was evolved through several versions and iterative testing and feedback through trials with able-bodied testers, stroke survivor volunteers, and practising clinicians.

A key finding of the research was that an adapted form of Fitts’s law, that models difficulty of reaching and touching objects in 3D interaction spaces, could be used to profile movement capability for able-bodied people and stroke patients vii in upper arm VR stroke rehabilitation. It was also found that even when Fitts’s law was less effective, that the statistics of the regression quality were still informative in profiling users. Fitts law regression statistics along with information on task performance (such as percentage of hits) could be used to adapt task difficulty or advising rest. Further, it was found that multiple regression could provide better movement capability profiles with a modified form of Fitts law to account for varying degrees of difficulty due to the angles of motion in 3D space. In addition, a novel approach was developed which profiled sectors of the 3D VR interaction space separately, rather than treat movement through the whole space as being equally difficult. This approach accounts for some stroke patients having more difficulty moving in some directions than others, e.g. up and left. Results demonstrate that this has potential but may need to be investigated further with stroke patients and with larger numbers of people.

The VR system that utilised the movement capability model was evolved over time with a user-centred design methodology, with input from able-bodied people, stroke patients, and clinicians. A final longitudinal study investigated the suitability of three bespoke games, the usability of the system over a longer time, and the effectiveness of the movement profiler and adaptive system. Throughout this experiment, the system provided informative user movement profile variations that could identify unique movement behaviour traits in individuals. Results showed that user performance varied over time and the adaptive system proved effective in changing the difficulty of the tasks for individuals over multiple sessions. The VR rehabilitation games incorporated enhanced gameplay and feedback, and users expressed enjoyment with the interactive experience. Throughout all of the experiments, users enjoyed wearing a VR headset, preferring it over a standard PC monitor. Most users subjectively felt that they were more effective in completing tasks within VR, and results from experiments provided empirical evidence to support this view. Results within this thesis support the proposal that an appropriately designed, adaptive gamebased VR system can provide an accessible, personalised and enjoyable rehabilitation system that can motivate more regular rehabilitation participation and promote improved motor function.
Date of AwardMay 2019
LanguageEnglish
Awarding Institution
SponsorsDEL
SupervisorDarryl Charles (Supervisor), Sally Mc Clean (Supervisor) & Philip Morrow (Supervisor)

Keywords

  • Virtual Reality
  • Stroke
  • Rehabilitation
  • VR
  • Fitts Law
  • Games
  • Gamification

Cite this

Upper Limb Movement Modelling for Adaptive and Personalised Physical Rehabilitation in Virtual Reality
Holmes, D. (Author). May 2019

Student thesis: Doctoral Thesis