Zombie Alert: re-engaging students in collaborative activities by embedding learning technologies in the curriculum.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Technology, used at the centre of learning can be both motivational and transformative to both teaching approaches and students learning. During this session I presented a paper which detailed a project undertaken with students to enrich their learning experience by utilising learning technologies into the curriculum. The project entitled ‘Re-enact: using mobile technologies in collaborative making activities’ involved students working in small peer groups to create work made in response to various stimuli. The project website then facilitated the documentation of the students working processes, as they were encouraged to reflect and review their work throughout. These reflections were recorded in a number of ways digitally (via smartphones, short film narratives, audio clips) and uploaded to the project blog for further group reflection and as a means of documenting the processes. Participants at the session were shown the project website to view some of the students work, hear their views on the process and the evaluation results were presented.Too often the news of new technologies can raise horrifying shrills and ducking for cover among colleagues. The pressure, perceived or otherwise, to include the latest ‘thing’ can be met with monstrous contempt and the experience for students as a result can be equally painful. This project aimed to utilise the contemporary student’s new body appendage – their phone, as an active tool in their learning experience. Digital literacy was also enhanced throughout the project as students were encouraged to improve their digital media manipulation and contextual understanding using a variety of programmes and processes. A new awareness of how technologies can be utilised to enhance and present students understanding of workshop content was also presented in the session. This session discussed how the curriculum was enriched and how the student experience was significantly enhanced.This project received funding from the HEA Changing the Learning Landscape (CLL) Professional Development Fund.

Conference

Conference'Heroes and monsters: extra-ordinary tales of learning and teaching in the arts and humanities', HEA Arts & Humanities Annual Conference
Period3/06/14 → …

Fingerprint

curriculum
learning
student
website
experience
working process
digital media
peer group
weblog
small group
documentation
manipulation
new technology
stimulus
news
funding
literacy
narrative
present
Teaching

Keywords

  • e-learning
  • curriculum
  • technologies
  • peer learning. learning spaces. learning landscape

Cite this

@inproceedings{21da708eb65d445d8551a0077afb4a60,
title = "Zombie Alert: re-engaging students in collaborative activities by embedding learning technologies in the curriculum.",
abstract = "Technology, used at the centre of learning can be both motivational and transformative to both teaching approaches and students learning. During this session I presented a paper which detailed a project undertaken with students to enrich their learning experience by utilising learning technologies into the curriculum. The project entitled ‘Re-enact: using mobile technologies in collaborative making activities’ involved students working in small peer groups to create work made in response to various stimuli. The project website then facilitated the documentation of the students working processes, as they were encouraged to reflect and review their work throughout. These reflections were recorded in a number of ways digitally (via smartphones, short film narratives, audio clips) and uploaded to the project blog for further group reflection and as a means of documenting the processes. Participants at the session were shown the project website to view some of the students work, hear their views on the process and the evaluation results were presented.Too often the news of new technologies can raise horrifying shrills and ducking for cover among colleagues. The pressure, perceived or otherwise, to include the latest ‘thing’ can be met with monstrous contempt and the experience for students as a result can be equally painful. This project aimed to utilise the contemporary student’s new body appendage – their phone, as an active tool in their learning experience. Digital literacy was also enhanced throughout the project as students were encouraged to improve their digital media manipulation and contextual understanding using a variety of programmes and processes. A new awareness of how technologies can be utilised to enhance and present students understanding of workshop content was also presented in the session. This session discussed how the curriculum was enriched and how the student experience was significantly enhanced.This project received funding from the HEA Changing the Learning Landscape (CLL) Professional Development Fund.",
keywords = "e-learning, curriculum, technologies, peer learning. learning spaces. learning landscape",
author = "Louise O'Boyle",
year = "2014",
month = "6",
day = "3",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

}

O'Boyle, L 2014, Zombie Alert: re-engaging students in collaborative activities by embedding learning technologies in the curriculum. in Unknown Host Publication. 'Heroes and monsters: extra-ordinary tales of learning and teaching in the arts and humanities', HEA Arts & Humanities Annual Conference, 3/06/14.

Zombie Alert: re-engaging students in collaborative activities by embedding learning technologies in the curriculum. / O'Boyle, Louise.

Unknown Host Publication. 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - Technology, used at the centre of learning can be both motivational and transformative to both teaching approaches and students learning. During this session I presented a paper which detailed a project undertaken with students to enrich their learning experience by utilising learning technologies into the curriculum. The project entitled ‘Re-enact: using mobile technologies in collaborative making activities’ involved students working in small peer groups to create work made in response to various stimuli. The project website then facilitated the documentation of the students working processes, as they were encouraged to reflect and review their work throughout. These reflections were recorded in a number of ways digitally (via smartphones, short film narratives, audio clips) and uploaded to the project blog for further group reflection and as a means of documenting the processes. Participants at the session were shown the project website to view some of the students work, hear their views on the process and the evaluation results were presented.Too often the news of new technologies can raise horrifying shrills and ducking for cover among colleagues. The pressure, perceived or otherwise, to include the latest ‘thing’ can be met with monstrous contempt and the experience for students as a result can be equally painful. This project aimed to utilise the contemporary student’s new body appendage – their phone, as an active tool in their learning experience. Digital literacy was also enhanced throughout the project as students were encouraged to improve their digital media manipulation and contextual understanding using a variety of programmes and processes. A new awareness of how technologies can be utilised to enhance and present students understanding of workshop content was also presented in the session. This session discussed how the curriculum was enriched and how the student experience was significantly enhanced.This project received funding from the HEA Changing the Learning Landscape (CLL) Professional Development Fund.

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