‘You hear about it for real in school.’ Avoiding, containing and risk-taking in the history classroom

Alan McCully, Alison Kitson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    In this article, Alison Kitson and Alan McCully discuss the findings of their research into history teaching in the most divided part of the United Kingdom: Northern Ireland. Drawing on interviews with students and teachers, they consider what history teaching might contribute to an understanding of the current situation and reflect on the extent to which opportunities might be being lost. They are interested primarily in teaching controversial issues and they construct a continuum of teacher response ranging from avoidance to risk-taking. Although they start in Northern Ireland, Kitson and McCully end in England. How far, they wonder, do English history teachers take risks by asking difficult questions about difficult issues?
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages32-37
    JournalTeaching History
    Volume120
    Issue number120
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    classroom
    Teaching
    teacher
    history
    school
    interview
    student

    Keywords

    • History teaching
    • Controversial Issues
    • Divided Societies
    • Conflict

    Cite this

    @article{633b07662ba7405f95a0bedd0a81be66,
    title = "‘You hear about it for real in school.’ Avoiding, containing and risk-taking in the history classroom",
    abstract = "In this article, Alison Kitson and Alan McCully discuss the findings of their research into history teaching in the most divided part of the United Kingdom: Northern Ireland. Drawing on interviews with students and teachers, they consider what history teaching might contribute to an understanding of the current situation and reflect on the extent to which opportunities might be being lost. They are interested primarily in teaching controversial issues and they construct a continuum of teacher response ranging from avoidance to risk-taking. Although they start in Northern Ireland, Kitson and McCully end in England. How far, they wonder, do English history teachers take risks by asking difficult questions about difficult issues?",
    keywords = "History teaching, Controversial Issues, Divided Societies, Conflict",
    author = "Alan McCully and Alison Kitson",
    note = "Reference text: Barton, K. & McCully, A. (2004) ‘History, identity, and the school curriculum in Northern Ireland: an empirical study of secondary students’ ideas and perspectives’ Journal of Curriculum Studies, Vol. 36 no. 6 Kitson, A. (2004) ‘Teaching history and reconciliation in Northern Ireland’, Carnegie Foundation Report.",
    year = "2005",
    language = "English",
    volume = "120",
    pages = "32--37",
    journal = "Teaching History",
    issn = "0040-0610",
    number = "120",

    }

    ‘You hear about it for real in school.’ Avoiding, containing and risk-taking in the history classroom. / McCully, Alan; Kitson, Alison.

    In: Teaching History, Vol. 120, No. 120, 2005, p. 32-37.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - ‘You hear about it for real in school.’ Avoiding, containing and risk-taking in the history classroom

    AU - McCully, Alan

    AU - Kitson, Alison

    N1 - Reference text: Barton, K. & McCully, A. (2004) ‘History, identity, and the school curriculum in Northern Ireland: an empirical study of secondary students’ ideas and perspectives’ Journal of Curriculum Studies, Vol. 36 no. 6 Kitson, A. (2004) ‘Teaching history and reconciliation in Northern Ireland’, Carnegie Foundation Report.

    PY - 2005

    Y1 - 2005

    N2 - In this article, Alison Kitson and Alan McCully discuss the findings of their research into history teaching in the most divided part of the United Kingdom: Northern Ireland. Drawing on interviews with students and teachers, they consider what history teaching might contribute to an understanding of the current situation and reflect on the extent to which opportunities might be being lost. They are interested primarily in teaching controversial issues and they construct a continuum of teacher response ranging from avoidance to risk-taking. Although they start in Northern Ireland, Kitson and McCully end in England. How far, they wonder, do English history teachers take risks by asking difficult questions about difficult issues?

    AB - In this article, Alison Kitson and Alan McCully discuss the findings of their research into history teaching in the most divided part of the United Kingdom: Northern Ireland. Drawing on interviews with students and teachers, they consider what history teaching might contribute to an understanding of the current situation and reflect on the extent to which opportunities might be being lost. They are interested primarily in teaching controversial issues and they construct a continuum of teacher response ranging from avoidance to risk-taking. Although they start in Northern Ireland, Kitson and McCully end in England. How far, they wonder, do English history teachers take risks by asking difficult questions about difficult issues?

    KW - History teaching

    KW - Controversial Issues

    KW - Divided Societies

    KW - Conflict

    M3 - Article

    VL - 120

    SP - 32

    EP - 37

    JO - Teaching History

    T2 - Teaching History

    JF - Teaching History

    SN - 0040-0610

    IS - 120

    ER -