Women's perceptions of support from partners, family members and close friends for smoking cessation during pregnancy--combining quantitative and qualitative findings.

Kathryn Thompson, Kader Parahoo, N McCurry, E O'Doherty, A M Doherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reports on data collected as part of a four-phase study initiated to strengthen practice in the field of smoking cessation during pregnancy. It focuses on the perceived support pregnant smokers would receive for quitting smoking and how this support could be effectively used by incorporating the education of partners/family in smoking cessation intervention strategies. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were employed, and data were collected from pregnant smokers through semistructured interviews and self-completed questionnaires. From the questionnaire data, the women reported that they would receive considerable support from their partners if they decided to stop smoking. The interviews, however, revealed that this support was 'potential' rather than 'real' and that the partners mostly made 'token gestures' such as smoking outside. None of the interviewed respondents reported receiving help in educating their partner/family about the risks of active and passive smoking, thus reducing the potential positive role they could play in smoking cessation. Whilst health professionals are aware of the important role the partner/family may play in successful smoking cessation interventions, these significant others are generally not involved. This study highlights the need for consideration to be given to providing opportunities for couples to be fully involved in smoking cessation interventions outside the antenatal environment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-39
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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