Why conspiracy theorists are not always paranoid: Conspiracy theories and paranoia form separate factors with distinct psychological predictors

Azzam Alsuhibani, Mark Shevlin, Daniel Freeman, Bryony Sheaves, Richard P. Bentall, Peter Karl Jonason (Editor)

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Abstract

Paranoia and belief in conspiracy theories both involve suspiciousness about the intentions of others but have rarely been studied together. In three studies, one with a mainly student sample (N = 496) and two with more representative UK population samples (N = 1,519, N = 638) we compared single and two-factor models of paranoia and conspiracy theories as well as associations between both belief systems and other psychological constructs. A model with two correlated factors was the best fit in all studies. Both belief systems were associated with poor locus of control (belief in powerful others and chance) and loneliness. Paranoid beliefs were specifically associated with negative self-esteem and, in two studies, insecure attachment; conspiracy theories were associated with positive self-esteem in the two larger studies and narcissistic personality traits in the final study. Conspiracist thinking but not paranoia was associated with poor performance on the Cognitive Reflection Task (poor analytical thinking). The findings suggest that paranoia and belief in conspiracy theories are distinct but correlated belief systems with both common and specific psychological components.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0259053
Pages (from-to)1-23
Number of pages23
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume17
Issue number4
Early online date7 Apr 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Alsuhibani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Keywords

  • Research Article
  • Research and analysis methods
  • Physical sciences
  • Biology and life sciences
  • Social sciences
  • Engineering and technology
  • Computer and information sciences
  • Paranoid Disorders
  • Self Concept
  • Humans
  • Loneliness

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