Who ‘Owns’ the Game? A critical reflection on membership owned models of football governance

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A significant body of literature has emerged over the past decade contrasting the supposed benefits of a move towards a membership owned/ mutual governance model for sporting clubs in the UK and Ireland (as well as elsewhere throughout Europe). In many cases it is presented as something of a utopian response to the apparent unrelenting commercialisation of sport, mostly association football, and is viewed as something of a final opportunity for supporters of professional (and semi-professional) teams to retain a stake in the welfare and future direction of the clubs to which they are closely tied. This paper recognises the inherent benefits of implementing such a model of sport governance, especially to ‘failing’ clubs, but outlines a number of reasons as to why we should remain cautious about assuming that, in the face of a range of competing models of governance, that a membership-owned approach is necessarily better or more desirable.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Number of pages16
Publication statusPublished - 24 Jul 2014
EventFIFA World Cup and the Nation: Culture, Politics, Identity - Oxford University
Duration: 24 Jul 2014 → …

Conference

ConferenceFIFA World Cup and the Nation: Culture, Politics, Identity
Period24/07/14 → …

Keywords

  • Football governance
  • membership models of governance
  • GAA

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