What do academic staff think about assessment and how can it help inform policy making and approaches to professional development?

Sarah Maguire, Lin Norton, Bill Norton

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Institutional assessment policies risk being perceived by those who must work
    with them as managerialist, an ideology that has been argued by Vincent (2011)
    as having a destructive effect in universities. One of the problems is that
    institutional policies tend to draw on generic pedagogical principles promulgated
    in the literature (e.g. assessment for learning; authentic assessment; dialogic
    feedback). They do not take account of the discipline specific or
    practitioner/professional nature of assessment. Research shows, however, that
    differences do exist (Neumann, et.al., 2002) so in order for institutional initiatives
    to succeed, it would seem sensible to explore Shay’s (2008) suggestion that they
    explicitly feature disciplinary forms of knowledge. The research reported here is a
    large scale assessment survey carried out at two institutions, designed to find out
    what academics from different disciplines with different learning and teaching
    orientations think about assessment design, marking and feedback. The
    anonymous survey, consists of two closed item questionnaires; one exploring
    assessment design beliefs and practices and the other measuring attitudes to
    marking and feedback. In one institution, a further section has been added asking
    specifically about two recent assessment initiatives specific to that institution. At
    the end of the survey, participants have been given the opportunity to add
    anything further that they think is relevant in an open text box. The Initial
    analysis from this survey will be presented with an articulated reflection on how
    such data can help inform and strategically target professional development,
    operationalize assessment policies and inform institutional teaching and learning
    strategy.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publication4th Assessment in Higher Education Conference
    Place of PublicationBirmingham
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    Event4th Assessment in Higher Education Conference - Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Duration: 26 Jun 201327 Jun 2013
    https://aheconference.com/conference-programme-2/

    Conference

    Conference4th Assessment in Higher Education Conference
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityBirmingham
    Period26/06/1327/06/13
    Internet address

    Fingerprint

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    Cite this

    Maguire, S., Norton, L., & Norton, B. (2013). What do academic staff think about assessment and how can it help inform policy making and approaches to professional development? In 4th Assessment in Higher Education Conference Birmingham.
    Maguire, Sarah ; Norton, Lin ; Norton, Bill. / What do academic staff think about assessment and how can it help inform policy making and approaches to professional development?. 4th Assessment in Higher Education Conference. Birmingham, 2013.
    @inproceedings{12ac9f5ae3614689a869bfc65c81a6b8,
    title = "What do academic staff think about assessment and how can it help inform policy making and approaches to professional development?",
    abstract = "Institutional assessment policies risk being perceived by those who must workwith them as managerialist, an ideology that has been argued by Vincent (2011)as having a destructive effect in universities. One of the problems is thatinstitutional policies tend to draw on generic pedagogical principles promulgatedin the literature (e.g. assessment for learning; authentic assessment; dialogicfeedback). They do not take account of the discipline specific orpractitioner/professional nature of assessment. Research shows, however, thatdifferences do exist (Neumann, et.al., 2002) so in order for institutional initiativesto succeed, it would seem sensible to explore Shay’s (2008) suggestion that theyexplicitly feature disciplinary forms of knowledge. The research reported here is alarge scale assessment survey carried out at two institutions, designed to find outwhat academics from different disciplines with different learning and teachingorientations think about assessment design, marking and feedback. Theanonymous survey, consists of two closed item questionnaires; one exploringassessment design beliefs and practices and the other measuring attitudes tomarking and feedback. In one institution, a further section has been added askingspecifically about two recent assessment initiatives specific to that institution. Atthe end of the survey, participants have been given the opportunity to addanything further that they think is relevant in an open text box. The Initialanalysis from this survey will be presented with an articulated reflection on howsuch data can help inform and strategically target professional development,operationalize assessment policies and inform institutional teaching and learningstrategy.",
    author = "Sarah Maguire and Lin Norton and Bill Norton",
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    language = "English",
    booktitle = "4th Assessment in Higher Education Conference",

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    Maguire, S, Norton, L & Norton, B 2013, What do academic staff think about assessment and how can it help inform policy making and approaches to professional development? in 4th Assessment in Higher Education Conference. Birmingham, 4th Assessment in Higher Education Conference, Birmingham, United Kingdom, 26/06/13.

    What do academic staff think about assessment and how can it help inform policy making and approaches to professional development? / Maguire, Sarah; Norton, Lin; Norton, Bill.

    4th Assessment in Higher Education Conference. Birmingham, 2013.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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    N2 - Institutional assessment policies risk being perceived by those who must workwith them as managerialist, an ideology that has been argued by Vincent (2011)as having a destructive effect in universities. One of the problems is thatinstitutional policies tend to draw on generic pedagogical principles promulgatedin the literature (e.g. assessment for learning; authentic assessment; dialogicfeedback). They do not take account of the discipline specific orpractitioner/professional nature of assessment. Research shows, however, thatdifferences do exist (Neumann, et.al., 2002) so in order for institutional initiativesto succeed, it would seem sensible to explore Shay’s (2008) suggestion that theyexplicitly feature disciplinary forms of knowledge. The research reported here is alarge scale assessment survey carried out at two institutions, designed to find outwhat academics from different disciplines with different learning and teachingorientations think about assessment design, marking and feedback. Theanonymous survey, consists of two closed item questionnaires; one exploringassessment design beliefs and practices and the other measuring attitudes tomarking and feedback. In one institution, a further section has been added askingspecifically about two recent assessment initiatives specific to that institution. Atthe end of the survey, participants have been given the opportunity to addanything further that they think is relevant in an open text box. The Initialanalysis from this survey will be presented with an articulated reflection on howsuch data can help inform and strategically target professional development,operationalize assessment policies and inform institutional teaching and learningstrategy.

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