What difference does peace make? Intimate partner violence and violent conflict in Northern Ireland

Jessica Doyle, Monica McWilliams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article investigates how the transaction from violent conflict to peace political settlement has shaped experiences of and responses to Intimate partner violence (IPV) in Northern Ireland focusing on three issues which are policing, paramilitarism and firearms. It does so on the basis of a comparative analysis of findings from semi-structured interviews with more than 100 women victims of IPV from across Northern Ireland conducted at two junctures; first in 1992 during a period of protracted armed conflict, and more recently in 2016 at a time of enduring peace. The findings trace the changes that have occurred across each of these areas, and highlight any problems that remain in the post-conflict environment. The implications of these findings for research and policy are then discussed.
LanguageEnglish
Article numberNA
PagesNA
Number of pages35
JournalViolence Against Women
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 10 Dec 2018

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peace
violence
transaction
interview
experience

Keywords

  • Violence Against Women
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Domestic Violence
  • Armed conflict
  • Peace process
  • NORTHERN IRELAND
  • police reform

Cite this

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What difference does peace make? Intimate partner violence and violent conflict in Northern Ireland. / Doyle, Jessica; McWilliams, Monica.

In: Violence Against Women, 10.12.2018, p. NA.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - This article investigates how the transaction from violent conflict to peace political settlement has shaped experiences of and responses to Intimate partner violence (IPV) in Northern Ireland focusing on three issues which are policing, paramilitarism and firearms. It does so on the basis of a comparative analysis of findings from semi-structured interviews with more than 100 women victims of IPV from across Northern Ireland conducted at two junctures; first in 1992 during a period of protracted armed conflict, and more recently in 2016 at a time of enduring peace. The findings trace the changes that have occurred across each of these areas, and highlight any problems that remain in the post-conflict environment. The implications of these findings for research and policy are then discussed.

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