Wave spray-induced sand transport and deposition during a coastal storm, Magilligan Point, Northern Ireland

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Abstract

Observations during a coastal storm at Magilligan Point, Northern Ireland reveal characteristic surficial deposits onshore produced by landward transport of sand within spray generated by strong winds and breaking waves. Conditions necessary for formation of such deposits include an adequate sediment supply, strong onshore waves and winds. onshore waves of short period and a low coastal scarp. The process, which may be locally important, is unlikely to be of great significance in contemporary sediment budget considerations and indicative figures suggest net landward transport rates of about 0.5 m(3)/metre of shoreline/hour during optimal conditions. Its importance as a source of cliff-top sediment over longer time m periods may be greater. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
LanguageEnglish
Pages377-383
JournalMarine Geology
Volume161
Issue number2-4
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1999

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spray
sand
breaking wave
sediment budget
wind wave
cliff
sediment
shoreline
rate

Cite this

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title = "Wave spray-induced sand transport and deposition during a coastal storm, Magilligan Point, Northern Ireland",
abstract = "Observations during a coastal storm at Magilligan Point, Northern Ireland reveal characteristic surficial deposits onshore produced by landward transport of sand within spray generated by strong winds and breaking waves. Conditions necessary for formation of such deposits include an adequate sediment supply, strong onshore waves and winds. onshore waves of short period and a low coastal scarp. The process, which may be locally important, is unlikely to be of great significance in contemporary sediment budget considerations and indicative figures suggest net landward transport rates of about 0.5 m(3)/metre of shoreline/hour during optimal conditions. Its importance as a source of cliff-top sediment over longer time m periods may be greater. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.",
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Wave spray-induced sand transport and deposition during a coastal storm, Magilligan Point, Northern Ireland. / Cooper, Andrew; Jackson, Derek.

In: Marine Geology, Vol. 161, No. 2-4, 10.1999, p. 377-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Wave spray-induced sand transport and deposition during a coastal storm, Magilligan Point, Northern Ireland

AU - Cooper, Andrew

AU - Jackson, Derek

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N2 - Observations during a coastal storm at Magilligan Point, Northern Ireland reveal characteristic surficial deposits onshore produced by landward transport of sand within spray generated by strong winds and breaking waves. Conditions necessary for formation of such deposits include an adequate sediment supply, strong onshore waves and winds. onshore waves of short period and a low coastal scarp. The process, which may be locally important, is unlikely to be of great significance in contemporary sediment budget considerations and indicative figures suggest net landward transport rates of about 0.5 m(3)/metre of shoreline/hour during optimal conditions. Its importance as a source of cliff-top sediment over longer time m periods may be greater. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

AB - Observations during a coastal storm at Magilligan Point, Northern Ireland reveal characteristic surficial deposits onshore produced by landward transport of sand within spray generated by strong winds and breaking waves. Conditions necessary for formation of such deposits include an adequate sediment supply, strong onshore waves and winds. onshore waves of short period and a low coastal scarp. The process, which may be locally important, is unlikely to be of great significance in contemporary sediment budget considerations and indicative figures suggest net landward transport rates of about 0.5 m(3)/metre of shoreline/hour during optimal conditions. Its importance as a source of cliff-top sediment over longer time m periods may be greater. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

M3 - Article

VL - 161

SP - 377

EP - 383

JO - Marine Geology

T2 - Marine Geology

JF - Marine Geology

SN - 0025-3227

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