Vitamin B6 and riboflavin, their metabolic interaction and relationship with MTHFR genotype, in adults aged 18-102 years

Harry Jarrett, H McNulty, Catherine Hughes, K. Pentieva, JJ Strain, Adrian McCann, LB McAnena, C Cunningham, AM Molloy, A Flynn, S. M. Hopkins, Geraldine Horigan, Ciara O'Connor, Janette Walton, Breige McNulty, Mike Gibney, Yvonne Lamers, M Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The generation of the active form of vitamin B6, pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (PLP), in tissues is dependent upon riboflavin as flavin mononucleotide, but whether this interaction is important for maintaining B6 status is unclear.
Objective: To investigate vitamin B6 and riboflavin status, their metabolic interaction and relationship with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype in adulthood.
Design: Data from 5612 adults aged 18-102y were drawn from the Irish National Adult Nutrition Survey (NANS; population-based sample) and the Trinity-Ulster-Department of Agriculture (TUDA) and Genovit cohorts (volunteer samples). Plasma PLP and erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient (EGRac), as a functional indicator of riboflavin, were determined.
Results: Older (≥65y) compared to younger (Conclusions: These results are consistent with the known metabolic dependency of PLP on FMN and suggest that riboflavin may be the limiting nutrient for maintaining vitamin B6 status, particularly in individuals with the MTHFR 677TT genotype. Randomized trials are necessary to investigate the PLP response to riboflavin intervention within the dietary range.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages38
JournalThe American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 19 Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Vitamin B6
  • riboflavin
  • pyridoxal 5’-phosphate
  • erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient
  • B-vitamin biomarkers
  • MTHFR
  • dietary intakes
  • Trinity-Ulster-Department of Agriculture (TUDA)

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