Vision in children with autism spectrum disorder: a critical review.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition with approximately 1-2 per cent prevalence in the population. The condition has lifelong effects for the individual and family, and early intervention and management helps maximise quality of life and outcomes. Many studies of vision in ASD have attempted to link the behavioural and sensory deficits in ASD with underlying visual processing. From this work, it is clear that individuals with ASD 'see' and process the world differently, but there remain gaps in our understanding. This review will summarise our current knowledge of key aspects of visual functions and the optometric profile of ASD. This includes findings regarding visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, refractive error, eye movements, binocular vision, near visual functions and retinal structure in ASD. From this, a pattern of knowledge emerges for children with ASD: we should expect normal visual acuity; there will likely be atypical eye movements and susceptibility for subtle visuo-motor deficits, there is an increased prevalence of strabismus; an increased likelihood of astigmatism and possibly other refractive errors; attention, crowding and task complexity will likely be problematic; and retinal structure and function may be compromised. Bringing this together, these findings highlight that further work is necessary, not only to understand how higher-level functions link to behaviours, but also to ensure there is a sound understanding of the building-blocks of vision to fully grasp the profile of visual processing as a whole in ASD. This review will give a translational viewpoint for clinicians, and underline the benefits of comprehensive vision care in ASD.
LanguageEnglish
Pages504-513
JournalClinical and Experimental Optometry
Volume101
Early online date11 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Refractive Errors
Eye Movements
Visual Acuity
Binocular Vision
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Contrast Sensitivity
Crowding
Astigmatism
Strabismus
Quality of Life
Population

Keywords

  • autism spectrum disorder
  • children
  • eye movements
  • refractive error
  • visual acuity

Cite this

@article{bbd4a28cc9984cf39ff3300efe156607,
title = "Vision in children with autism spectrum disorder: a critical review.",
abstract = "Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition with approximately 1-2 per cent prevalence in the population. The condition has lifelong effects for the individual and family, and early intervention and management helps maximise quality of life and outcomes. Many studies of vision in ASD have attempted to link the behavioural and sensory deficits in ASD with underlying visual processing. From this work, it is clear that individuals with ASD 'see' and process the world differently, but there remain gaps in our understanding. This review will summarise our current knowledge of key aspects of visual functions and the optometric profile of ASD. This includes findings regarding visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, refractive error, eye movements, binocular vision, near visual functions and retinal structure in ASD. From this, a pattern of knowledge emerges for children with ASD: we should expect normal visual acuity; there will likely be atypical eye movements and susceptibility for subtle visuo-motor deficits, there is an increased prevalence of strabismus; an increased likelihood of astigmatism and possibly other refractive errors; attention, crowding and task complexity will likely be problematic; and retinal structure and function may be compromised. Bringing this together, these findings highlight that further work is necessary, not only to understand how higher-level functions link to behaviours, but also to ensure there is a sound understanding of the building-blocks of vision to fully grasp the profile of visual processing as a whole in ASD. This review will give a translational viewpoint for clinicians, and underline the benefits of comprehensive vision care in ASD.",
keywords = "autism spectrum disorder, children, eye movements, refractive error, visual acuity",
author = "Julie-Anne Little",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1111/cxo.12651",
language = "English",
volume = "101",
pages = "504--513",
journal = "Clinical and Experimental Optometry",
issn = "0816-4622",

}

Vision in children with autism spectrum disorder: a critical review. / Little, Julie-Anne.

In: Clinical and Experimental Optometry, Vol. 101, 26.06.2018, p. 504-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vision in children with autism spectrum disorder: a critical review.

AU - Little, Julie-Anne

PY - 2018/6/26

Y1 - 2018/6/26

N2 - Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition with approximately 1-2 per cent prevalence in the population. The condition has lifelong effects for the individual and family, and early intervention and management helps maximise quality of life and outcomes. Many studies of vision in ASD have attempted to link the behavioural and sensory deficits in ASD with underlying visual processing. From this work, it is clear that individuals with ASD 'see' and process the world differently, but there remain gaps in our understanding. This review will summarise our current knowledge of key aspects of visual functions and the optometric profile of ASD. This includes findings regarding visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, refractive error, eye movements, binocular vision, near visual functions and retinal structure in ASD. From this, a pattern of knowledge emerges for children with ASD: we should expect normal visual acuity; there will likely be atypical eye movements and susceptibility for subtle visuo-motor deficits, there is an increased prevalence of strabismus; an increased likelihood of astigmatism and possibly other refractive errors; attention, crowding and task complexity will likely be problematic; and retinal structure and function may be compromised. Bringing this together, these findings highlight that further work is necessary, not only to understand how higher-level functions link to behaviours, but also to ensure there is a sound understanding of the building-blocks of vision to fully grasp the profile of visual processing as a whole in ASD. This review will give a translational viewpoint for clinicians, and underline the benefits of comprehensive vision care in ASD.

AB - Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition with approximately 1-2 per cent prevalence in the population. The condition has lifelong effects for the individual and family, and early intervention and management helps maximise quality of life and outcomes. Many studies of vision in ASD have attempted to link the behavioural and sensory deficits in ASD with underlying visual processing. From this work, it is clear that individuals with ASD 'see' and process the world differently, but there remain gaps in our understanding. This review will summarise our current knowledge of key aspects of visual functions and the optometric profile of ASD. This includes findings regarding visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, refractive error, eye movements, binocular vision, near visual functions and retinal structure in ASD. From this, a pattern of knowledge emerges for children with ASD: we should expect normal visual acuity; there will likely be atypical eye movements and susceptibility for subtle visuo-motor deficits, there is an increased prevalence of strabismus; an increased likelihood of astigmatism and possibly other refractive errors; attention, crowding and task complexity will likely be problematic; and retinal structure and function may be compromised. Bringing this together, these findings highlight that further work is necessary, not only to understand how higher-level functions link to behaviours, but also to ensure there is a sound understanding of the building-blocks of vision to fully grasp the profile of visual processing as a whole in ASD. This review will give a translational viewpoint for clinicians, and underline the benefits of comprehensive vision care in ASD.

KW - autism spectrum disorder

KW - children

KW - eye movements

KW - refractive error

KW - visual acuity

U2 - 10.1111/cxo.12651

DO - 10.1111/cxo.12651

M3 - Article

VL - 101

SP - 504

EP - 513

JO - Clinical and Experimental Optometry

T2 - Clinical and Experimental Optometry

JF - Clinical and Experimental Optometry

SN - 0816-4622

ER -