Virtual reality in the rehabilitation of the arm after hemiplegic stroke: A randomized controlled pilot study

Jacqueline Crosbie, Sheila Lennon, M C McGoldrick, M Dj McNeill, Suzanne McDonough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the feasibility of a trial to investigate the effectiveness of virtual reality-mediated therapy compared to conventional physiotherapy in the motor rehabilitation of the arm following stroke, and to provide data for a power analysis to determine numbers for a future main trial.Design: Pilot randomized controlled trial.Setting: Clinical research facility.Participants: Eighteen people with a first stroke, 10 males and 8 females, 7 right and 2 left side most affected. Mean time since stroke 10.8 months.Interventions: Participants were randomized to a virtual reality group or a conventional arm therapy group for nine sessions over three weeks.Main measures: The upper limb Motricity Index and the Action Research Arm Test were completed at baseline, post intervention and six weeks follow-up.Results: Outcome data were obtained from 95% of participants at the end of treatment and at follow-up: one participant withdrew. Compliance was high; only two people reported side-effects from virtual reality exposure. Both groups demonstrated small (7-8 points on upper limb Motricity Index and 4 points on the Action Research Arm Test), but non-significant, changes to their arm impairment and activity levels.Conclusion: A randomized controlled trial of virtual reality-mediated therapy comparable to conventional therapy would be feasible, with some suggested improvements in recruitment and outcome measures. Seventy-eight participants (39 per group) would be required for a main trial.
LanguageEnglish
Pages798-806
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
Volume26
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012

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Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy
Arm
Rehabilitation
Health Services Research
Stroke
Upper Extremity
Randomized Controlled Trials
Group Psychotherapy
Compliance
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Therapeutics
Research

Cite this

Crosbie, Jacqueline ; Lennon, Sheila ; McGoldrick, M C ; McNeill, M Dj ; McDonough, Suzanne. / Virtual reality in the rehabilitation of the arm after hemiplegic stroke: A randomized controlled pilot study. In: Clinical Rehabilitation. 2012 ; Vol. 26, No. 9. pp. 798-806.
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Virtual reality in the rehabilitation of the arm after hemiplegic stroke: A randomized controlled pilot study. / Crosbie, Jacqueline; Lennon, Sheila; McGoldrick, M C; McNeill, M Dj; McDonough, Suzanne.

In: Clinical Rehabilitation, Vol. 26, No. 9, 09.2012, p. 798-806.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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