VERBAL JUDGMENTS OF A SURFACES ORIENTATION-IN-DEPTH IN DEGREES OF ANGLE - EQUIDISTANCE TENDENCY, MOTION INEFFECTIVENESS, AND AUTOMATICITY

Anthony Reinhardt-Rutland

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    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Moving-monocular viewing and static-binocular viewing can elicit veridical verbal judgments of a real surface's orientation-in-depth; however, separation-in-depth of real objects is often underestimated; the equidistance tendency applies. The discrepancy might be explained by the differing automaticity of judgments: Surfaces are judged automatically in minutes of analog time, and objects are judged nonautomatically in distance units. This hypothesis was tested by employing less automatic judgments, in degrees of angle, for surfaces. Judgments were broadly veridical for two rectangular surfaces in all viewing conditions (static-monocular, moving-monocular, static-binocular, and moving-binocular), as well as for two trapezoidal surfaces during binocular viewing. However, contrasting with analog-time data, judgments of the trapezoidal surfaces during monocular viewing tended to the frontal plane; the equidistance tendency applied, and motion had little effect. The results support a role for automaticity of verbal judgments and argue against purely `'ecological'' approaches to depth perception.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages305-316
    JournalJournal of General Psychology
    Volume122
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 1995

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    Automaticity
    Depth Perception

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    abstract = "Moving-monocular viewing and static-binocular viewing can elicit veridical verbal judgments of a real surface's orientation-in-depth; however, separation-in-depth of real objects is often underestimated; the equidistance tendency applies. The discrepancy might be explained by the differing automaticity of judgments: Surfaces are judged automatically in minutes of analog time, and objects are judged nonautomatically in distance units. This hypothesis was tested by employing less automatic judgments, in degrees of angle, for surfaces. Judgments were broadly veridical for two rectangular surfaces in all viewing conditions (static-monocular, moving-monocular, static-binocular, and moving-binocular), as well as for two trapezoidal surfaces during binocular viewing. However, contrasting with analog-time data, judgments of the trapezoidal surfaces during monocular viewing tended to the frontal plane; the equidistance tendency applied, and motion had little effect. The results support a role for automaticity of verbal judgments and argue against purely `'ecological'' approaches to depth perception.",
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    VERBAL JUDGMENTS OF A SURFACES ORIENTATION-IN-DEPTH IN DEGREES OF ANGLE - EQUIDISTANCE TENDENCY, MOTION INEFFECTIVENESS, AND AUTOMATICITY. / Reinhardt-Rutland, Anthony.

    In: Journal of General Psychology, Vol. 122, No. 3, 07.1995, p. 305-316.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AB - Moving-monocular viewing and static-binocular viewing can elicit veridical verbal judgments of a real surface's orientation-in-depth; however, separation-in-depth of real objects is often underestimated; the equidistance tendency applies. The discrepancy might be explained by the differing automaticity of judgments: Surfaces are judged automatically in minutes of analog time, and objects are judged nonautomatically in distance units. This hypothesis was tested by employing less automatic judgments, in degrees of angle, for surfaces. Judgments were broadly veridical for two rectangular surfaces in all viewing conditions (static-monocular, moving-monocular, static-binocular, and moving-binocular), as well as for two trapezoidal surfaces during binocular viewing. However, contrasting with analog-time data, judgments of the trapezoidal surfaces during monocular viewing tended to the frontal plane; the equidistance tendency applied, and motion had little effect. The results support a role for automaticity of verbal judgments and argue against purely `'ecological'' approaches to depth perception.

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