Validation of the International Trauma Interview (ITI) for the Clinical Assessment of ICD-11 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Complex PTSD (CPTSD) in a Lithuanian Sample

Odeta Gelezelyte, Neil Roberts, Monika Kvedaraite, Jonathan I Bisson, Chris R. Brewin, Marylene Cloitre, Agniete Kairyte, Thanos Karatzias, M Shevlin, Evaldas Kazlauskas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The 11 revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) includes a new diagnosis of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD). The International Trauma Interview (ITI) is a novel clinician-administered diagnostic interview for the assessment of ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the ITI in a Lithuanian sample in relation to interrater agreement, latent structure, internal reliability, as well as convergent and discriminant validity. In total, 103 adults with a history of various traumatic experiences participated in the study. The sample was predominantly female (83.5%), with a mean age of 32.64 years ( = 9.36). For the assessment of ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD, the ITI and the self-report International Trauma Questionnaire (ITQ) were used. Mental health indicators, such as depression, anxiety, and dissociation, were measured using self-report questionnaires. The latent structure of the ITI was evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). In order to test the convergent and discriminant validity of the ITI we conducted a structural equation model (SEM). Overall, based on the ITI, 18.4% of participants fulfilled diagnostic criteria for PTSD and 21.4% for CPTSD. A second-order two-factor CFA model of the ITI PTSD and disturbances in self-organization (DSO) symptoms demonstrated a good fit. The associations with various mental health indicators supported the convergent and discriminant validity of the ITI. The clinician-administered ITI and self-report ITQ had poor to moderate diagnostic agreement across different symptom clusters. The ITI is a reliable and valid tool for assessing and diagnosing ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD. [Abstract copyright: © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.]
Original languageEnglish
Article number2037905
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalEuropean Journal of Psychotraumatology
Volume13
Issue number1
Early online date23 Feb 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study has received funding from the European Social Fund [project No 09.3.3-LMT-K-712-19-0048] under a grant agreement with the Research Council of Lithuania (LMTLT).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

© 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Funding Information:
This study has received funding from the European Social Fund [project No 09.3.3-LMT-K-712-19-0048] under a grant agreement with the Research Council of Lithuania (LMTLT).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

© 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • International Trauma Interview
  • posttraumatic stress disorder
  • complex posttraumatic stress disorder
  • assessment
  • ICD-11
  • Surveys and Questionnaires/standards
  • Emotional Regulation
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Adult
  • Female
  • Lithuania
  • Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis
  • Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis
  • Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
  • Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic
  • Assessment
  • Icd-11
  • Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
  • Surveys and Questionnaires

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Validation of the International Trauma Interview (ITI) for the Clinical Assessment of ICD-11 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Complex PTSD (CPTSD) in a Lithuanian Sample'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this