Validation of a non-invasive imaging photoplethysmography device to assess plantar skin perfusion, a comparison with laser speckle contrast analysis

D. Allan, N. Chockalingam, R. Naemi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Assessing skin perfusion is an established and reliable method to study impaired lower limb blood flow. Laser Speckle Contrast Analysis (LASCA) has been identified as the current gold standard to measure skin perfusion. Imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) is a new low-cost imaging technique to assess perfusion. However, it is unclear how results obtained from this technique compare against that of LASCA at plantar skin. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between the skin perfusion at the plantar surface of the foot using iPPG and LASCA. Perfusion at six plantar locations (Hallux, 1st 3rd 5th metatarsal heads, midfoot, heel) was simultaneously measured using LASCA and iPPG in 20 healthy participants. Skin thickness and skin temperature were also collected at the same plantar locations. Spearman’s rank tests showed significant associations with medium strength between the perfusion values measured with LASCA and iPPG for most tested sites. No improvement in the relationship between iPPG and LASCA data was observed when controlling for either skin thickness or skin temperature. Skin perfusion values obtained using iPPG were found to be significantly associated with the corresponding values obtained using the gold standard LASCA device. Additionally, the measurement of perfusion using iPPG is shown to be robust.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)170-176
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Medical Engineering and Technology
Volume45
Issue number3
Early online date22 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished online - 22 Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Imaging Photoplethysmography
  • Laser speckle
  • microvascular
  • skin perfusion
  • plantar soft tissue

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