Using Disability Law to expand Academic Freedom for Disabled Researchers in the United Kingdom

Reuben Kirkham, Mary Webster, Ko-Le Chen, John Vines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We consider the findings of a study of the experiences of Postgraduate Researchers with Disabilities and explore how this relates to academic freedom. Drawing upon the provisions of the Public Sector Equality Duty and Indirect Discrimination within the Equality Act (2010), we note that a range of existing public policy practices, such as the operation of the REF, are likely to be in breach of these obligations. We recommend revisions to existing practice that speak more widely to the general concern of academic freedom, suggesting that a consideration of anti‐discrimination law – rather than a purely intellectually focussed agenda – represents a pragmatic means towards shaping the inclusivity of higher education policy going forwards.
LanguageEnglish
Pages65-91
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Historical Sociology
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Mar 2016

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equality
disability
Law
affirmative action
obligation
public sector
pragmatics
public policy
discrimination
act
education
experience

Keywords

  • Disability Law
  • Sociology

Cite this

Kirkham, Reuben ; Webster, Mary ; Chen, Ko-Le ; Vines, John. / Using Disability Law to expand Academic Freedom for Disabled Researchers in the United Kingdom. 2016 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 65-91.
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Using Disability Law to expand Academic Freedom for Disabled Researchers in the United Kingdom. / Kirkham, Reuben; Webster, Mary; Chen, Ko-Le; Vines, John.

Vol. 29, No. 1, 24.03.2016, p. 65-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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