Using computerised interactive response technology to assess electrocardiographers and for aggregating diagnoses

Aaron Peace, Adesh Ramsewak, Andrew Cairns, Dewar Finlay, Daniel Guldenring, Gari Clifford, Raymond Bond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) is a crucial diagnostic tool. However, the ideal method to assess competency in ECG interpretation remains unclear. We sought to evaluate whether keypad response technology provides a rapid, interactive way to assess ECG knowledge. 75 participants were enrolled [32 (43%) Primary Care Physicians, 24 (32%) Hospital Medical Staff and 19 (25%) Nurse Practitioners]. Nineteen ECGs with 4 possible answers were interpreted. Out of 1425 possible decisions 1054 (73.9%) responses were made. Only 570/1425 (40%) of the responses were correct. Diagnostic accuracy varied (0% to 78%, mean 42% ± 21%) across the entire cohort. Participation was high, (median 83%, IQR 50%–100%). Hospital Medical Staff had significantly higher diagnostic accuracy than nurse practitioners (50 ± 20% vs. 38 ± 19%, p = 0.04) and Primary Care Physicians (50 ± 20% vs. 40 ± 21%, p = 0.07) although not significant. Interactive voting systems can be rapidly and successfully used to assess ECG interpretation. Further education is necessary to improve diagnostic accuracy.
LanguageEnglish
Pages995-999
JournalJournal of Electrocardiology
Volume48
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2015

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Electrocardiography
Technology
Hospital Medical Staffs
Nurse Practitioners
Primary Care Physicians
Politics
Education

Keywords

  • ECG
  • TEL
  • technology enhanced training

Cite this

Peace, Aaron ; Ramsewak, Adesh ; Cairns, Andrew ; Finlay, Dewar ; Guldenring, Daniel ; Clifford, Gari ; Bond, Raymond. / Using computerised interactive response technology to assess electrocardiographers and for aggregating diagnoses. In: Journal of Electrocardiology. 2015 ; Vol. 48, No. 6. pp. 995-999.
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abstract = "The 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) is a crucial diagnostic tool. However, the ideal method to assess competency in ECG interpretation remains unclear. We sought to evaluate whether keypad response technology provides a rapid, interactive way to assess ECG knowledge. 75 participants were enrolled [32 (43{\%}) Primary Care Physicians, 24 (32{\%}) Hospital Medical Staff and 19 (25{\%}) Nurse Practitioners]. Nineteen ECGs with 4 possible answers were interpreted. Out of 1425 possible decisions 1054 (73.9{\%}) responses were made. Only 570/1425 (40{\%}) of the responses were correct. Diagnostic accuracy varied (0{\%} to 78{\%}, mean 42{\%} ± 21{\%}) across the entire cohort. Participation was high, (median 83{\%}, IQR 50{\%}–100{\%}). Hospital Medical Staff had significantly higher diagnostic accuracy than nurse practitioners (50 ± 20{\%} vs. 38 ± 19{\%}, p = 0.04) and Primary Care Physicians (50 ± 20{\%} vs. 40 ± 21{\%}, p = 0.07) although not significant. Interactive voting systems can be rapidly and successfully used to assess ECG interpretation. Further education is necessary to improve diagnostic accuracy.",
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Using computerised interactive response technology to assess electrocardiographers and for aggregating diagnoses. / Peace, Aaron; Ramsewak, Adesh; Cairns, Andrew; Finlay, Dewar; Guldenring, Daniel; Clifford, Gari; Bond, Raymond.

In: Journal of Electrocardiology, Vol. 48, No. 6, 01.11.2015, p. 995-999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Cairns, Andrew

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AU - Bond, Raymond

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