Using bar-code technology to capture clinical intervention data in a hospital with a stand-alone pharmacy computer system

Michael Scott, James Bell, Kathryn Burnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The use of bar-code technology to capture data on pharmacists' clinical interventions is described.Method: At a hospital in Northern Ireland, patient-specific information could not be accessed through the pharmacy computer system. A system comprising six hand-held barcode readers and software for downloading data was purchased. The pharmacy staff selected a range of fields for recording a wide array of data on clinical interventions, including patient outcomes. Patient details that could not easily be bar-coded had to be recorded manually. The process was evaluated over three four-week cycles, with the data fields being revised after each cycle and the interventions being judged for their clinical appropriateness and their conformance with inhouse standards. After the thrird cycle, the need for manual recording of information was eliminated.Results: A total of 857 interventions were made during the three cycles. Performance met or exceeded the standard for 7 (50%) of 14 indicators for the first cycle, 8 (53%) of 15 for the second cycle, and 13 (81%) of 16 for the third cycle. For all three cycles, the majority of the interventions were important and resulted in an improvement in the standard of care.Conclusion: A bar-code driven data collection system successfully replaced a manual system for documenting pharamcists' clinical interventions.
LanguageEnglish
Pages651-654
JournalAmerican Journal of Health-System Pharmacy
Volume53
Issue number15
Publication statusPublished - 15 Mar 1996

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Computer Systems
Automatic Data Processing
Technology
Northern Ireland
Standard of Care
Pharmacists
Information Systems
Software
Hand

Keywords

  • Clinical pharmacists
  • computers
  • interventions
  • patient care
  • technology

Cite this

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abstract = "Introduction: The use of bar-code technology to capture data on pharmacists' clinical interventions is described.Method: At a hospital in Northern Ireland, patient-specific information could not be accessed through the pharmacy computer system. A system comprising six hand-held barcode readers and software for downloading data was purchased. The pharmacy staff selected a range of fields for recording a wide array of data on clinical interventions, including patient outcomes. Patient details that could not easily be bar-coded had to be recorded manually. The process was evaluated over three four-week cycles, with the data fields being revised after each cycle and the interventions being judged for their clinical appropriateness and their conformance with inhouse standards. After the thrird cycle, the need for manual recording of information was eliminated.Results: A total of 857 interventions were made during the three cycles. Performance met or exceeded the standard for 7 (50{\%}) of 14 indicators for the first cycle, 8 (53{\%}) of 15 for the second cycle, and 13 (81{\%}) of 16 for the third cycle. For all three cycles, the majority of the interventions were important and resulted in an improvement in the standard of care.Conclusion: A bar-code driven data collection system successfully replaced a manual system for documenting pharamcists' clinical interventions.",
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Using bar-code technology to capture clinical intervention data in a hospital with a stand-alone pharmacy computer system. / Scott, Michael; Bell, James; Burnett, Kathryn.

In: American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, Vol. 53, No. 15, 15.03.1996, p. 651-654.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Introduction: The use of bar-code technology to capture data on pharmacists' clinical interventions is described.Method: At a hospital in Northern Ireland, patient-specific information could not be accessed through the pharmacy computer system. A system comprising six hand-held barcode readers and software for downloading data was purchased. The pharmacy staff selected a range of fields for recording a wide array of data on clinical interventions, including patient outcomes. Patient details that could not easily be bar-coded had to be recorded manually. The process was evaluated over three four-week cycles, with the data fields being revised after each cycle and the interventions being judged for their clinical appropriateness and their conformance with inhouse standards. After the thrird cycle, the need for manual recording of information was eliminated.Results: A total of 857 interventions were made during the three cycles. Performance met or exceeded the standard for 7 (50%) of 14 indicators for the first cycle, 8 (53%) of 15 for the second cycle, and 13 (81%) of 16 for the third cycle. For all three cycles, the majority of the interventions were important and resulted in an improvement in the standard of care.Conclusion: A bar-code driven data collection system successfully replaced a manual system for documenting pharamcists' clinical interventions.

AB - Introduction: The use of bar-code technology to capture data on pharmacists' clinical interventions is described.Method: At a hospital in Northern Ireland, patient-specific information could not be accessed through the pharmacy computer system. A system comprising six hand-held barcode readers and software for downloading data was purchased. The pharmacy staff selected a range of fields for recording a wide array of data on clinical interventions, including patient outcomes. Patient details that could not easily be bar-coded had to be recorded manually. The process was evaluated over three four-week cycles, with the data fields being revised after each cycle and the interventions being judged for their clinical appropriateness and their conformance with inhouse standards. After the thrird cycle, the need for manual recording of information was eliminated.Results: A total of 857 interventions were made during the three cycles. Performance met or exceeded the standard for 7 (50%) of 14 indicators for the first cycle, 8 (53%) of 15 for the second cycle, and 13 (81%) of 16 for the third cycle. For all three cycles, the majority of the interventions were important and resulted in an improvement in the standard of care.Conclusion: A bar-code driven data collection system successfully replaced a manual system for documenting pharamcists' clinical interventions.

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