Users, carers and professionals experiences of treatment and care for heroin dependency: Implications for practice. A preliminary study.

Marina Braden, Iain W. McGowan, Derek F. McLaughlin, Hugh P. McKenna, Sinead Keeney, Breige Quinn

Research output: Non-textual formWeb publication/site

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: This paper reports on the treatment and care experiences for heroin dependency in a Northern Ireland Healthcare Trust.Background: There is a dearth of multi-dimensional heroin dependency treatment perspectives inbackground qualitative peer-reviewed literature. This is surprising given the influence of “consumer evaluation” in service development.Method: Focus groups were undertaken with separate purposive samples of ex/current heroin users(n = 7), carers of ex/current heroin users (n = 4) and professionals involved in heroin dependency service provision (n = 4). Non-directive question schedules elicited collective phenomenological experiences. Focus groups were transcribed verbatim and content analyzed.Findings: Study participants shared mainly dehumanizing experiences of treatment and care provision often characterized by non-communicative and judgemental health professional conduct. Unpredictable prescribing protocol and limited treatment resources have overshadowed any beneficial experiences of substitute prescribing in our pilot study. Findings also showed that participants requested treatment choice and holistic care provision.Conclusions: Incoherent drug treatment policy and communication breakdown between treatmentstakeholders has influenced a cyclical blame culture in this study.
Original languageEnglish
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Sep 2010

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Keywords

  • Treatment experience
  • heroin dependency
  • focus groups

Cite this

Braden, M. (Author), McGowan, I. W. (Author), McLaughlin, D. F. (Author), McKenna, H. P. (Author), Keeney, S. (Author), & Quinn, B. (Author). (2010). Users, carers and professionals experiences of treatment and care for heroin dependency: Implications for practice. A preliminary study.. Web publication/site https://doi.org/10.3109/14659891.2010.495818