Unveiling the Past-Preparing the Conditions for Human Beings to Live in the Midst of One ANother Again? A Response from Living in Northern Ireland

Derick Wilson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    AbstractThe need for structures that arrest and cut the slide into the vortex of inhuman actions, one to another, have their necessary place alongside the need to acknowledge harm done, make reparation and promote a more restorative, healing future together (Consultative Group on the Past. Report of the Consultative Group on the Past. 2009). Acknowledgement and remembrance are essential. Such new rituals encourage a culture of not hiding the violence; they also embolden citizens, groups, and institutional representatives—at a distance of time from the events—to stand against any such actions being tolerated again. This response to Lingis draws on extensive practical experience in practical reconciliation work since 1965, including directing a residential reconciliation centre and a small sanctuary facility for people intimidated from their homes (The Corrymeela Centre, 1978-85); doctoral and post doctoral research and developmental practice in conflict resolution and peace education (1985-) as well as being an associate academic member of the pilot Northern Ireland Victims and Survivors Forum (2009-2011).
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages333-335
    JournalJournal of Bioethical Inquiry
    Volume8
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 26 Nov 2011

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    Northern Ireland
    Ceremonial Behavior
    Negotiating
    Violence
    Survivors
    Education
    reconciliation
    human being
    Research
    peace education
    reparation
    Group
    sanctuary
    conflict resolution
    religious behavior
    violence
    citizen
    event
    experience

    Keywords

    • Reconciliation-Restorative Justice-Truth-Acknowledgement-Remembrance

    Cite this

    @article{a2095ac8ae32410b911ba225d6f7f302,
    title = "Unveiling the Past-Preparing the Conditions for Human Beings to Live in the Midst of One ANother Again? A Response from Living in Northern Ireland",
    abstract = "AbstractThe need for structures that arrest and cut the slide into the vortex of inhuman actions, one to another, have their necessary place alongside the need to acknowledge harm done, make reparation and promote a more restorative, healing future together (Consultative Group on the Past. Report of the Consultative Group on the Past. 2009). Acknowledgement and remembrance are essential. Such new rituals encourage a culture of not hiding the violence; they also embolden citizens, groups, and institutional representatives—at a distance of time from the events—to stand against any such actions being tolerated again. This response to Lingis draws on extensive practical experience in practical reconciliation work since 1965, including directing a residential reconciliation centre and a small sanctuary facility for people intimidated from their homes (The Corrymeela Centre, 1978-85); doctoral and post doctoral research and developmental practice in conflict resolution and peace education (1985-) as well as being an associate academic member of the pilot Northern Ireland Victims and Survivors Forum (2009-2011).",
    keywords = "Reconciliation-Restorative Justice-Truth-Acknowledgement-Remembrance",
    author = "Derick Wilson",
    note = "Reference text: References Arendt, H. 1969. On violence. New York: Harcourt Brace. Atran, S. 2010. Talking to the enemy: Violent extremism, sacred values, and what it means to be human. New York: HarperCollins Consultative Group on the Past. 2009. Report of the Consultative Group on the Past. Presented to the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. http://www.irishtimes.com/focus/2009/troubles/index.pdf Eyben, K., D. Morrow, and D.A. Wilson. 1997. A worthwhile venture? Practically investing in equity, diversity and interdependence in Northern Ireland? Coleraine, Northern Ireland: University of Ulster. Girard, R. 1987. Things hidden since the foundation of the world. Trans. S. Bann and M. Metteer. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Originally published as Des choses caches depuis la fondation du monde (Paris: {\'E}ditions Grasset and Fasquelle, 1978). Girard, R. 2010. Battling to the end: Conversations with Beno{\^i}t Chantre. Trans. M. Baker. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press. Lederach, J.P. 2005. The Moral Imagination: The art and soul of building peace. New York: Oxford University Press. Lingis, A. 2011. Truth in reconciliation. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8(3). doi:10.1007/s11673-011-9306-2. Morrow, D., and D.A. Wilson. 2011. Girard, violence and the troubles in Northern Ireland (TBC). Paper presented at the Surviving our Origins: Violence and the Sacred in Evolutionary-Historical Time symposium, May 27–28, at St. John’s College, University of Cambridge. Northern Ireland Commission for Victims and Survivors. 2010. Presentation on behalf of CVSNI to OFMDFM Committee on Dealing with the Past. Accessed 31 August 2011. http://www.cvsni.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=142:presentation-on-behalf-of-cvsni-to-ofmdfm-committee-on-dealing-with-the-past&catid=44:latest-cvsni-news&Itemid=54. Rothfield,P. 2008. Lead Essay: Evaluating reconciliation. In Pathways to Reconciliation: Between theory and practice.eds. P. Rothfield, C. Fleming and P. A. Komesaroff, 15-28. Aldershot,UK: Ashgate. Shriver, D.W., Jr. 2005. Honest patriots: Loving a country enough to remember its misdeeds. New York: Oxford University Press. Shriver, D.W., Jr. 2007. Truths for reconciliation: An American perspective. Belfast: Northern Ireland Community Relations Council. Accessed August 31, 2011. http://www.community-relations.org.uk/fs/doc/Shriverspeech.doc. Wilson, D.A. 1994. Learning together for a change. D. Phil., School of Education, University of Ulster. Wright, F. 1987. Northern Ireland: A comparative analysis. Dublin: Gill and Macmillan.",
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    N1 - Reference text: References Arendt, H. 1969. On violence. New York: Harcourt Brace. Atran, S. 2010. Talking to the enemy: Violent extremism, sacred values, and what it means to be human. New York: HarperCollins Consultative Group on the Past. 2009. Report of the Consultative Group on the Past. Presented to the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. http://www.irishtimes.com/focus/2009/troubles/index.pdf Eyben, K., D. Morrow, and D.A. Wilson. 1997. A worthwhile venture? Practically investing in equity, diversity and interdependence in Northern Ireland? Coleraine, Northern Ireland: University of Ulster. Girard, R. 1987. Things hidden since the foundation of the world. Trans. S. Bann and M. Metteer. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Originally published as Des choses caches depuis la fondation du monde (Paris: Éditions Grasset and Fasquelle, 1978). Girard, R. 2010. Battling to the end: Conversations with Benoît Chantre. Trans. M. Baker. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press. Lederach, J.P. 2005. The Moral Imagination: The art and soul of building peace. New York: Oxford University Press. Lingis, A. 2011. Truth in reconciliation. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8(3). doi:10.1007/s11673-011-9306-2. Morrow, D., and D.A. Wilson. 2011. Girard, violence and the troubles in Northern Ireland (TBC). Paper presented at the Surviving our Origins: Violence and the Sacred in Evolutionary-Historical Time symposium, May 27–28, at St. John’s College, University of Cambridge. Northern Ireland Commission for Victims and Survivors. 2010. Presentation on behalf of CVSNI to OFMDFM Committee on Dealing with the Past. Accessed 31 August 2011. http://www.cvsni.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=142:presentation-on-behalf-of-cvsni-to-ofmdfm-committee-on-dealing-with-the-past&catid=44:latest-cvsni-news&Itemid=54. Rothfield,P. 2008. Lead Essay: Evaluating reconciliation. In Pathways to Reconciliation: Between theory and practice.eds. P. Rothfield, C. Fleming and P. A. Komesaroff, 15-28. Aldershot,UK: Ashgate. Shriver, D.W., Jr. 2005. Honest patriots: Loving a country enough to remember its misdeeds. New York: Oxford University Press. Shriver, D.W., Jr. 2007. Truths for reconciliation: An American perspective. Belfast: Northern Ireland Community Relations Council. Accessed August 31, 2011. http://www.community-relations.org.uk/fs/doc/Shriverspeech.doc. Wilson, D.A. 1994. Learning together for a change. D. Phil., School of Education, University of Ulster. Wright, F. 1987. Northern Ireland: A comparative analysis. Dublin: Gill and Macmillan.

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    N2 - AbstractThe need for structures that arrest and cut the slide into the vortex of inhuman actions, one to another, have their necessary place alongside the need to acknowledge harm done, make reparation and promote a more restorative, healing future together (Consultative Group on the Past. Report of the Consultative Group on the Past. 2009). Acknowledgement and remembrance are essential. Such new rituals encourage a culture of not hiding the violence; they also embolden citizens, groups, and institutional representatives—at a distance of time from the events—to stand against any such actions being tolerated again. This response to Lingis draws on extensive practical experience in practical reconciliation work since 1965, including directing a residential reconciliation centre and a small sanctuary facility for people intimidated from their homes (The Corrymeela Centre, 1978-85); doctoral and post doctoral research and developmental practice in conflict resolution and peace education (1985-) as well as being an associate academic member of the pilot Northern Ireland Victims and Survivors Forum (2009-2011).

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