Universal Credit could be a lifeline in Northern Ireland, but it must be designed with people who use it

Ruth Patrick, Mark Simpson

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned reportpeer-review

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Abstract

Universal Credit (UC) as first introduced to Northern Ireland in September 2017, replacing six legacy benefits for working-age adults. UC operates differently in Northern Ireland when compared to England, Wales and Scotland. Typically, it is paid twice each month with housing payments going directly to landlords. In addition, there are provisions for supplementary payments to mitigate the impact of some recent social security reforms such as the benefit cap and opportunities to apply for discretionary funds.
This study provides insights into how claimants experience UC in Northern Ireland, what lessons the rest of the UK can learn from devolved-level innovations, and how the benefit might develop in Northern Ireland. The findings and policy recommendations presented are grounded in the expertise of recipients of UC.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationYork
PublisherJoseph Rowntree Foundation
Number of pages53
ISBN (Electronic)978 1 911581 80 2
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Universal Credit
  • social security
  • Devolution
  • Northern ireland
  • Participatory research
  • co-production
  • welfare state

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