Twitter and Wordclouds; Part 1, process

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

How do you know what students are learning in class from day to day?This poster describes part 1 of a process designed to effectively communicate what students felt they had learned during a classroom session. I did this to try and go beyond traditional methods of evaluation and really focus on what they felt they had learned. So, I asked students in my class to reflect on what we had done that morning with reference to our intended learning outcomes and record their thoughts on bespoke evaluation cards. The data generated by these were converted to a word cloud generator that enabled the “big ideas” to be seen. So far so good; now I knew what the big ideas were but how would I get that information back to the students? Normally I would put pictures up on Blackboard Learn but I wanted them to get the picture quickly so it occurred to me that Twitter would serve this purpose succinctly. So, the word cloud was tweeted to the students using a unique hashtag, (#pgcne16 and #pgcne16s2) and thus I could see when they accessed it and knew they were getting it in a timely fashion
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Number of pages35
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 20 Apr 2017
Event28th International Networking for Healthcare Education Conference - Churchill College Cambridge
Duration: 20 Apr 2017 → …

Conference

Conference28th International Networking for Healthcare Education Conference
Period20/04/17 → …

Fingerprint

twitter
student
poster
evaluation
learning
classroom

Keywords

  • Twitter
  • Wordclouds
  • Feedback
  • NVivo

Cite this

McGowan, B. (Accepted/In press). Twitter and Wordclouds; Part 1, process. In Unknown Host Publication
McGowan, Brian. / Twitter and Wordclouds; Part 1, process. Unknown Host Publication. 2017.
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title = "Twitter and Wordclouds; Part 1, process",
abstract = "How do you know what students are learning in class from day to day?This poster describes part 1 of a process designed to effectively communicate what students felt they had learned during a classroom session. I did this to try and go beyond traditional methods of evaluation and really focus on what they felt they had learned. So, I asked students in my class to reflect on what we had done that morning with reference to our intended learning outcomes and record their thoughts on bespoke evaluation cards. The data generated by these were converted to a word cloud generator that enabled the “big ideas” to be seen. So far so good; now I knew what the big ideas were but how would I get that information back to the students? Normally I would put pictures up on Blackboard Learn but I wanted them to get the picture quickly so it occurred to me that Twitter would serve this purpose succinctly. So, the word cloud was tweeted to the students using a unique hashtag, (#pgcne16 and #pgcne16s2) and thus I could see when they accessed it and knew they were getting it in a timely fashion",
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note = "Reference text: Leitch R. (2006). Limitations of language: Developing arts-based creative narrative in stories of teachers’ identities. Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice.12. 5. 549 –569 McNiff J. (2013). Action Research Principles and Practice. Third edition. Abingdon. Routledge Race P. (2010). Making Learning Happen. A Guide for Post Compulsory Education. Second edition. London. Sage",
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McGowan, B 2017, Twitter and Wordclouds; Part 1, process. in Unknown Host Publication. 28th International Networking for Healthcare Education Conference, 20/04/17.

Twitter and Wordclouds; Part 1, process. / McGowan, Brian.

Unknown Host Publication. 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Twitter and Wordclouds; Part 1, process

AU - McGowan, Brian

N1 - Reference text: Leitch R. (2006). Limitations of language: Developing arts-based creative narrative in stories of teachers’ identities. Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice.12. 5. 549 –569 McNiff J. (2013). Action Research Principles and Practice. Third edition. Abingdon. Routledge Race P. (2010). Making Learning Happen. A Guide for Post Compulsory Education. Second edition. London. Sage

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N2 - How do you know what students are learning in class from day to day?This poster describes part 1 of a process designed to effectively communicate what students felt they had learned during a classroom session. I did this to try and go beyond traditional methods of evaluation and really focus on what they felt they had learned. So, I asked students in my class to reflect on what we had done that morning with reference to our intended learning outcomes and record their thoughts on bespoke evaluation cards. The data generated by these were converted to a word cloud generator that enabled the “big ideas” to be seen. So far so good; now I knew what the big ideas were but how would I get that information back to the students? Normally I would put pictures up on Blackboard Learn but I wanted them to get the picture quickly so it occurred to me that Twitter would serve this purpose succinctly. So, the word cloud was tweeted to the students using a unique hashtag, (#pgcne16 and #pgcne16s2) and thus I could see when they accessed it and knew they were getting it in a timely fashion

AB - How do you know what students are learning in class from day to day?This poster describes part 1 of a process designed to effectively communicate what students felt they had learned during a classroom session. I did this to try and go beyond traditional methods of evaluation and really focus on what they felt they had learned. So, I asked students in my class to reflect on what we had done that morning with reference to our intended learning outcomes and record their thoughts on bespoke evaluation cards. The data generated by these were converted to a word cloud generator that enabled the “big ideas” to be seen. So far so good; now I knew what the big ideas were but how would I get that information back to the students? Normally I would put pictures up on Blackboard Learn but I wanted them to get the picture quickly so it occurred to me that Twitter would serve this purpose succinctly. So, the word cloud was tweeted to the students using a unique hashtag, (#pgcne16 and #pgcne16s2) and thus I could see when they accessed it and knew they were getting it in a timely fashion

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McGowan B. Twitter and Wordclouds; Part 1, process. In Unknown Host Publication. 2017