Towards Autonomic Computing: Effective Event Management

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autonomic computing is emerging as a significant new approach for the design of computing systems. Its goal is the production of systems that are self-managing, self-healing, self-protecting and self-optimizing. Achieving this goal involve techniques from both software engineering and artificial intelligence. We discuss one particular aspect of autonomic computing: event management. It considers the range of event handling techniques in use, particularly in relation to distributed systems. Intelligent approaches are illustrated using the example of event handling in telecommunication systems. In particular, the telecom survivable network architecture is analyzed to identify lessons and potential pitfalls for autonomic computing.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
Pages40-47
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2002
Event27th Annual IEEE/NASA Software Engineering Workshop (SEW) - Maryland, USA
Duration: 1 Dec 2002 → …

Conference

Conference27th Annual IEEE/NASA Software Engineering Workshop (SEW)
Period1/12/02 → …

Fingerprint

Telecommunication systems
Network architecture
Artificial intelligence
Software engineering

Cite this

Sterritt, R. / Towards Autonomic Computing: Effective Event Management. Unknown Host Publication. 2002. pp. 40-47
@inproceedings{e35e49e4be56443f9c21f4a97d2a58fb,
title = "Towards Autonomic Computing: Effective Event Management",
abstract = "Autonomic computing is emerging as a significant new approach for the design of computing systems. Its goal is the production of systems that are self-managing, self-healing, self-protecting and self-optimizing. Achieving this goal involve techniques from both software engineering and artificial intelligence. We discuss one particular aspect of autonomic computing: event management. It considers the range of event handling techniques in use, particularly in relation to distributed systems. Intelligent approaches are illustrated using the example of event handling in telecommunication systems. In particular, the telecom survivable network architecture is analyzed to identify lessons and potential pitfalls for autonomic computing.",
author = "R Sterritt",
year = "2002",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1109/SEW.2002.1199448",
language = "English",
pages = "40--47",
booktitle = "Unknown Host Publication",

}

Sterritt, R 2002, Towards Autonomic Computing: Effective Event Management. in Unknown Host Publication. pp. 40-47, 27th Annual IEEE/NASA Software Engineering Workshop (SEW), 1/12/02. https://doi.org/10.1109/SEW.2002.1199448

Towards Autonomic Computing: Effective Event Management. / Sterritt, R.

Unknown Host Publication. 2002. p. 40-47.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Towards Autonomic Computing: Effective Event Management

AU - Sterritt, R

PY - 2002/12

Y1 - 2002/12

N2 - Autonomic computing is emerging as a significant new approach for the design of computing systems. Its goal is the production of systems that are self-managing, self-healing, self-protecting and self-optimizing. Achieving this goal involve techniques from both software engineering and artificial intelligence. We discuss one particular aspect of autonomic computing: event management. It considers the range of event handling techniques in use, particularly in relation to distributed systems. Intelligent approaches are illustrated using the example of event handling in telecommunication systems. In particular, the telecom survivable network architecture is analyzed to identify lessons and potential pitfalls for autonomic computing.

AB - Autonomic computing is emerging as a significant new approach for the design of computing systems. Its goal is the production of systems that are self-managing, self-healing, self-protecting and self-optimizing. Achieving this goal involve techniques from both software engineering and artificial intelligence. We discuss one particular aspect of autonomic computing: event management. It considers the range of event handling techniques in use, particularly in relation to distributed systems. Intelligent approaches are illustrated using the example of event handling in telecommunication systems. In particular, the telecom survivable network architecture is analyzed to identify lessons and potential pitfalls for autonomic computing.

U2 - 10.1109/SEW.2002.1199448

DO - 10.1109/SEW.2002.1199448

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 40

EP - 47

BT - Unknown Host Publication

ER -