Tissue antioxidants and postmenopausal breast cancer: The European community multicentre study on antioxidants, myocardial infarction, and cancer of the breast (EURAMIC)

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Abstract

Antioxidants may protect against free radical mediated carcinogenesis. Epidemiological studies have not confirmed this hypothesis for breast cancer, possibly because of methodological limitations. Time-integrated exposure of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene in adipose tissue, and selenium in toenails was investigated in a case-control study among postmenopausal women, ages 50-74 years, from five European countries. The study group comprised 347 incident breast cancer cases and 374 controls. Mean antioxidant levels, adjusted for age and center, did not significantly differ for alpha-tocopherol (cases were 4.5% higher than controls), beta-carotene (3.0% lower), or selenium (1.8% lower). Odds ratios for highest versus lowest tertiles of exposure, adjusted for potential confounders, were 1.15 (95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.77), 0.74 (0.45-1.23), and 0.96 (0.63-1.47), respectively, without evidence for a decreasing trend. No statistically significant interactions were observed. Moreover, a provisional antioxidant score, indicating whether concentrations were above the median for zero, one, two, or all three antioxidants, yielded odds ratios of 1.00 (reference; all below median), 1.58, 1.58, and 1.21, respectively (chi(2) for association = 4.00; P = 0.26). These results do not support the hypothesis that antioxidants are important determinants of this hormone-related malignancy among postmenopausal women.
LanguageEnglish
Pages441-447
JournalCancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume5
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1996

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European Union
Multicenter Studies
Antioxidants
Myocardial Infarction
Breast Neoplasms
beta Carotene
alpha-Tocopherol
Selenium
Odds Ratio
Nails
Free Radicals
Adipose Tissue
Case-Control Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Carcinogenesis
Hormones
Confidence Intervals
Neoplasms

Cite this

@article{53b660925b5246c2b2f7bb9f8a727fcb,
title = "Tissue antioxidants and postmenopausal breast cancer: The European community multicentre study on antioxidants, myocardial infarction, and cancer of the breast (EURAMIC)",
abstract = "Antioxidants may protect against free radical mediated carcinogenesis. Epidemiological studies have not confirmed this hypothesis for breast cancer, possibly because of methodological limitations. Time-integrated exposure of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene in adipose tissue, and selenium in toenails was investigated in a case-control study among postmenopausal women, ages 50-74 years, from five European countries. The study group comprised 347 incident breast cancer cases and 374 controls. Mean antioxidant levels, adjusted for age and center, did not significantly differ for alpha-tocopherol (cases were 4.5{\%} higher than controls), beta-carotene (3.0{\%} lower), or selenium (1.8{\%} lower). Odds ratios for highest versus lowest tertiles of exposure, adjusted for potential confounders, were 1.15 (95{\%} confidence interval, 0.75-1.77), 0.74 (0.45-1.23), and 0.96 (0.63-1.47), respectively, without evidence for a decreasing trend. No statistically significant interactions were observed. Moreover, a provisional antioxidant score, indicating whether concentrations were above the median for zero, one, two, or all three antioxidants, yielded odds ratios of 1.00 (reference; all below median), 1.58, 1.58, and 1.21, respectively (chi(2) for association = 4.00; P = 0.26). These results do not support the hypothesis that antioxidants are important determinants of this hormone-related malignancy among postmenopausal women.",
author = "JJ Strain",
year = "1996",
month = "6",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "441--447",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention",
issn = "1055-9965",
number = "6",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Tissue antioxidants and postmenopausal breast cancer: The European community multicentre study on antioxidants, myocardial infarction, and cancer of the breast (EURAMIC)

AU - Strain, JJ

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N2 - Antioxidants may protect against free radical mediated carcinogenesis. Epidemiological studies have not confirmed this hypothesis for breast cancer, possibly because of methodological limitations. Time-integrated exposure of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene in adipose tissue, and selenium in toenails was investigated in a case-control study among postmenopausal women, ages 50-74 years, from five European countries. The study group comprised 347 incident breast cancer cases and 374 controls. Mean antioxidant levels, adjusted for age and center, did not significantly differ for alpha-tocopherol (cases were 4.5% higher than controls), beta-carotene (3.0% lower), or selenium (1.8% lower). Odds ratios for highest versus lowest tertiles of exposure, adjusted for potential confounders, were 1.15 (95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.77), 0.74 (0.45-1.23), and 0.96 (0.63-1.47), respectively, without evidence for a decreasing trend. No statistically significant interactions were observed. Moreover, a provisional antioxidant score, indicating whether concentrations were above the median for zero, one, two, or all three antioxidants, yielded odds ratios of 1.00 (reference; all below median), 1.58, 1.58, and 1.21, respectively (chi(2) for association = 4.00; P = 0.26). These results do not support the hypothesis that antioxidants are important determinants of this hormone-related malignancy among postmenopausal women.

AB - Antioxidants may protect against free radical mediated carcinogenesis. Epidemiological studies have not confirmed this hypothesis for breast cancer, possibly because of methodological limitations. Time-integrated exposure of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene in adipose tissue, and selenium in toenails was investigated in a case-control study among postmenopausal women, ages 50-74 years, from five European countries. The study group comprised 347 incident breast cancer cases and 374 controls. Mean antioxidant levels, adjusted for age and center, did not significantly differ for alpha-tocopherol (cases were 4.5% higher than controls), beta-carotene (3.0% lower), or selenium (1.8% lower). Odds ratios for highest versus lowest tertiles of exposure, adjusted for potential confounders, were 1.15 (95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.77), 0.74 (0.45-1.23), and 0.96 (0.63-1.47), respectively, without evidence for a decreasing trend. No statistically significant interactions were observed. Moreover, a provisional antioxidant score, indicating whether concentrations were above the median for zero, one, two, or all three antioxidants, yielded odds ratios of 1.00 (reference; all below median), 1.58, 1.58, and 1.21, respectively (chi(2) for association = 4.00; P = 0.26). These results do not support the hypothesis that antioxidants are important determinants of this hormone-related malignancy among postmenopausal women.

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 441

EP - 447

JO - Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention

T2 - Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention

JF - Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention

SN - 1055-9965

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ER -