Timekeeping strategies operate independently from spatial and accuracy demands in beat-interception movements

Marta M N Bieńkiewicz, Matthew W M Rodger, Cathy M Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevailing paradigm for researching sensorimotor synchronisation in humans involves finger tapping and temporal accuracy measures. However, many successful sensorimotor synchronisation actions require not only to be 'in time', but also to be in a predefined spatial position. Reaching this spatial position in many everyday actions often exceeds the average amplitude of a finger movement. The aim of this study is to address how people coordinate their movement to be in the right place at the right time when the scale of the movement varies. Does the scale of the movement and accuracy demands of the movement change the ability to accurately synchronise? To address these questions, a sensorimotor synchronisation task with three different inter-beat intervals, two different movement amplitudes and two different target widths was used. Our experiment demonstrated that people use different timing strategies-employing either a movement strategy (varying movement time) or a waiting strategy (keeping movement time constant) for large-scale movements. Those two strategies were found to be equally successful in terms of temporal accuracy and variability (spread of errors). With longer interval durations (2.5 and 3.5 s), variability of sensorimotor synchronisation performance increased (measured as the spread of errors). Analysing the data using the Vorberg and Wing (Handbook of perception and action. Academic Press, New York, pp 181-262, 1996) model shows a need to develop further existing timing models of sensorimotor synchronisation so that they could apply to large-scale movements, where different movement strategies naturally emerge.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241–253
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume222
Issue number3
Early online date18 Aug 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2012

Keywords

  • TIME, PHASE-CORRECTION, INTERVALS, INFORMATION CAPACITY, Prospective temporal control, Timing strategies, Event-based timing, SENSORIMOTOR SYNCHRONIZATION, DISCRIMINATION, PERCEPTION, DISCRETE MOTOR-RESPONSES, Vorberg-Wing model, CEREBELLAR LESIONS, Sensorimotor synchronisation, DURATIONS

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