Third Sector Housing Partnerships in Northern Ireland

David Mullins, Jenny Muir, Nick Acheson

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

    Abstract

    This study was commissioned by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive (NIHE) to build on existing work on third sector partnerships undertaken by the Third Sector Research Centre (TSRC) (Rees at al 2012 a and b). The main focus of this work was on partnership structures, drivers and barriers, processes impacts and learning from partnership working.Work on Northern Ireland housing partnerships was undertaken by the University of Ulster and Queen’s University Belfast in partnership with TSRC. This focused on case studies of social housing Procurement Groups (PGs) and Supporting People (SP) Partnerships. The former included case studies of two of the three PGs between 2011 and 2012, while the latter focused on two community based schemes with mental health and homeless service users. These are examples of ‘mandated partnerships’ linked to public procurement and commissioning processes with several layers of regulation. As such these provide examples of the construction of “auditable organisations’ where effectiveness is influenced by relationships external to the partnerships. The report therefore places particular emphasis on procurement, commissioning and regulation to understand the drivers of these partnerships and to a large extent their structure, operation and effectiveness.The report uses the term hybridity to describe organisations that have a mixture of state, market and private sector characteristics; partly as a result of their origins and mission and partly in response to external drivers. State policy influences include the Concordat between the Voluntary and Community Sector and the Northern Ireland Government, (Department for Social Development (DSDNI) 2011) as well as procurement and regulatory drivers outlined above. Market influences include commercial and business plan drivers that affect the relationship between housing associations (HAs) and support providers in SP partnerships. Third Sector influences involve civil society roots and independence from the state and may also include legitimacy and trust, professionalism and the key advantage for HAs of their borrowing being treated as non-government for the purpose of public accounts.The unifying feature of the two case studies is that they concern voluntary and community sector organisations delivering public services. Taken together the two programmes considered here (the Social Housing Development Programme and the SP Programme) account for around half of total Government funding to the Voluntary and Community sector in NI. Moreover, these are both fields in which voluntary and community providers have a long-standing dominance for several reasons. In one case because of substitution for NIHE as developers of new social housing to exploit the borrowing advantages of HAs, in the other because of the comparative advantage of the voluntary and community sector in social care, building on community roots, legitimacy and professionalism.While delivery of services by voluntary and community sector organisations has a number of advantages as set out above, there are also perceived disadvantages from the perspective of public procurement. Independence is seen as reducing scope for public control, their limited scale and resources as reducing ability to bear risk and enable scale economies and on occasions a perceived lack of professionalism. A mirror image set of disadvantages arise from the perspective of voluntary and community organisations themselves including potential loss of independence and sacrifice of mission for mandate. The Concordat referred to above was an attempt to balance these positions, but is generally less influential than procurement and commissioning in establishing relationships between Government and voluntary and community providers of public services.
    LanguageEnglish
    Number of pages65
    Publication statusPublished - 5 Aug 2013

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    housing
    community
    driver
    social housing
    concordat
    public service
    legitimacy
    regulation
    housing development
    market
    social development
    substitution
    civil society
    private sector
    Group
    funding
    mental health
    economy
    lack
    ability

    Cite this

    Mullins, D., Muir, J., & Acheson, N. (2013). Third Sector Housing Partnerships in Northern Ireland.
    Mullins, David ; Muir, Jenny ; Acheson, Nick. / Third Sector Housing Partnerships in Northern Ireland. 2013. 65 p.
    @book{44ca8c37968a4a73a4a3160ede4aa76e,
    title = "Third Sector Housing Partnerships in Northern Ireland",
    abstract = "This study was commissioned by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive (NIHE) to build on existing work on third sector partnerships undertaken by the Third Sector Research Centre (TSRC) (Rees at al 2012 a and b). The main focus of this work was on partnership structures, drivers and barriers, processes impacts and learning from partnership working.Work on Northern Ireland housing partnerships was undertaken by the University of Ulster and Queen’s University Belfast in partnership with TSRC. This focused on case studies of social housing Procurement Groups (PGs) and Supporting People (SP) Partnerships. The former included case studies of two of the three PGs between 2011 and 2012, while the latter focused on two community based schemes with mental health and homeless service users. These are examples of ‘mandated partnerships’ linked to public procurement and commissioning processes with several layers of regulation. As such these provide examples of the construction of “auditable organisations’ where effectiveness is influenced by relationships external to the partnerships. The report therefore places particular emphasis on procurement, commissioning and regulation to understand the drivers of these partnerships and to a large extent their structure, operation and effectiveness.The report uses the term hybridity to describe organisations that have a mixture of state, market and private sector characteristics; partly as a result of their origins and mission and partly in response to external drivers. State policy influences include the Concordat between the Voluntary and Community Sector and the Northern Ireland Government, (Department for Social Development (DSDNI) 2011) as well as procurement and regulatory drivers outlined above. Market influences include commercial and business plan drivers that affect the relationship between housing associations (HAs) and support providers in SP partnerships. Third Sector influences involve civil society roots and independence from the state and may also include legitimacy and trust, professionalism and the key advantage for HAs of their borrowing being treated as non-government for the purpose of public accounts.The unifying feature of the two case studies is that they concern voluntary and community sector organisations delivering public services. Taken together the two programmes considered here (the Social Housing Development Programme and the SP Programme) account for around half of total Government funding to the Voluntary and Community sector in NI. Moreover, these are both fields in which voluntary and community providers have a long-standing dominance for several reasons. In one case because of substitution for NIHE as developers of new social housing to exploit the borrowing advantages of HAs, in the other because of the comparative advantage of the voluntary and community sector in social care, building on community roots, legitimacy and professionalism.While delivery of services by voluntary and community sector organisations has a number of advantages as set out above, there are also perceived disadvantages from the perspective of public procurement. Independence is seen as reducing scope for public control, their limited scale and resources as reducing ability to bear risk and enable scale economies and on occasions a perceived lack of professionalism. A mirror image set of disadvantages arise from the perspective of voluntary and community organisations themselves including potential loss of independence and sacrifice of mission for mandate. The Concordat referred to above was an attempt to balance these positions, but is generally less influential than procurement and commissioning in establishing relationships between Government and voluntary and community providers of public services.",
    author = "David Mullins and Jenny Muir and Nick Acheson",
    note = "Reference text: Acheson, N. (2010) ‘Welfare State reform and restructuring relations between the state and the voluntary sector: Reflections on Northern Ireland evidence’, Voluntary Sector Review 1 (2); Acheson, N. (2011) Hybridization in Complex Policy Fields: a Case Study of ‘SP’ in Northern Ireland, Paper presented at the National Council for Voluntary Organisations/Voluntary Sector Studies Network conference, London. Billis, D. (2010) ‘Towards a Theory of Hybrid Organisations’ in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges for Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Billis, D., H. Glennerster (1998) ‘Human Services and the Voluntary Sector’, Journal of Social Policy 27 (1) 79-98 Birrell, D. (2009) The Impact of Devolution on Social Policy, Bristol: The Policy Press. Blessing, A. (2012) ‘Magical or Monstrous? Hybridity in Social Housing Governance’, Housing Studies 27(2): 189-207. Bratt, R. (2012) The Quadruple Bottom Line and NonProfit Housing Organisations in the United States. Housing Studies 27, 4: 438-456. Buckingham, H. (2009) Competition and contracts in the voluntary sector: exploring the implications for homelessness support providers in Southampton. Policy and Politics 37.2 pp 235-254. Buckingham H. (2011) Hybridity, diversity and the division of labour in the third sector: what can we learn from homelessness organisations in the UK?. Voluntary Sector Review 2.2: 157-175. Cabinet Office (2005) Better regulation - from design to delivery (annual report 2005) Better Regulation Taskforce {"}. London , Cabinet Office Card, P. (2009) Governance and Accountability in collaborative working models: a case study of social housing procurement consortia in Wales, Paper presented to the ISA International Housing Conference, University of Glasgow, September 1st – 4th 2009. Carr, H. (2005) ‘‘Some-one to Watch over me’: Making Supported Housing Work’, Social and Legal Studies 14, 387-408. Clarke, J., J. Newman, N. Smith, E. Vidler, L. Westmarland (2008) Creating Citizen Consumers, London, Thousand Oaks CA: Sage Publications. Deakin, N (1996) Commission on the Future of the Voluntary Sector. London. De Bruijn, H and ten Heuvelhof, E (2008) Management in Networks. On Multi-actor decision making. London, Routledge. Devine, P., G. Kelly, G. Robinson (2011) An Age of Change? Community Relations in Northern Ireland, ARK Research Update 72, Belfast: ARK. DFP NI (2012) Memorandum on the Third Report of the Public Accounts Committee: Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector, Belfast: Department of Finance and Personnel. DETR (1998) Rethinking Construction: the report of the construction task force (Egan Report), London: Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions. DFP (2011) Public Procurement: a guide for social economy enterprises, Procurement Guidance Note 01/11, Belfast: Department of Finance and Personnel Central Procurement Directorate. DFP (2012a) Northern Ireland Public Procurement Policy (version 8), Belfast: Department of Finance and Personnel Central Procurement Directorate. DFP (2012b) Public Procurement: a guide for small and medium-sized enterprises Procurement Guidance Note 02/12, Belfast: Department of Finance and Personnel Central Procurement Directorate. DHSSSP (2005) A Strategic Framework for Adult Mental Health Services, Belfast: Department for Health, Social Services and Public Safety. DHSSSP (2007) Promoting the Social Inclusion of People with a Mental Health Problem or a Learning Disability, Belfast: Department for Health, Social Services and Public Safety. DSD (2008) Procurement Strategy for the Social Housing Development Programme, Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSD (2012a) Facing the Future: Northern Ireland Housing Strategy 2012-17 Consultation Document, Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSD (2012b) Inspection of Helm Housing Association Round 2 Final Report, Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSDNI (2011a) Concordat between the Voluntary and Community Sector and the Northern Ireland Government, Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSDNI (2011b) Evaluation of the Impact of the Supporting People Policy and its administration. Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSDNI (2012) Northern Ireland Supporting People Guidance, Belfast: Department for Social Development. Giddens, A (1998) The Third Way: The Renewal of Social Democracy. Cambridge, Polity. Gray, A.M., D. Birrell (2012) ‘Coalition Government and Northern Ireland: Social Policy and the Lowest Common Denominator Thesis’, Social Policy and Society 11 (1) 15-26. Hampton, P (2005) Reducing administrative burdens: effective inspection and enforcement. London, Dpeartment for Business, Innovation and Skills Harris, M. (2010) Third Sector Organisations in a Contradictory Policy Environment in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges for Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Hood C, Scott C, James O, Jones G W, Travers A (1999) Regulation Inside Government. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK. Horgan, G., A.M.Gray (2012) ‘Devolution in Northern Ireland: a Lost Opportunity?’, Critical Social Policy 32 (3) 467-478. Housemark Cymru (2007) Welsh Housing Association Consortia: Overcoming the barriers, Coventry: Housemark Cymru. Kerlin J.A. (2006) Social Enterprise in the United States and Europe: Understanding and Learning from the Differences. Voluntas 17: 247-263. Lupton, M. and Kent-Smith, J. (2012) Does Size Matter? Or does culture drive value for money? Coventry: Chartered Institute of Housing. Macmillan, R. (2011) ‘Seeing things differently? The promise of qualitative longitudinal research on the third sector’, TSRC Working Paper 56. McClelland, J. (2012) Maximising the Impact of Welsh Procurement Policy, Cardiff: Welsh Assembly Government. Minkoff, D. (2002). The emergence of hybrid organisational forms: Combining identity based service provision and political action. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 31, 377–401. Muir, J. (2012) Policy difference and policy ownership under UK devolution: social housing policy in Northern Ireland, ISEP Working Paper 5, Belfast: Institute of Spatial and Environmental Planning, Queen’s University Belfast. Muir, J. and Mullins, D. (2012) The governance of change: Procurement of social housing in Northern Ireland. Housing Studies Association Conference, York, April 2012. Mullins, D. and Craig, L. (2005) Testing the Climate: Mergers and Alliances in the housing association sector, London: National Housing Federation. Mullins, D. with Acheson, N. and Muir, J. (2012) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: Housing Partnerships and Consortia in Northern Ireland, Birmingham: Third Sector Research Centre/ University of Birmingham. Mullins, D., Rhodes, M.L. & Williamson, A. (2001) ‘Organizational Fields and Third Sector Housing in Ireland, North and South’, Voluntas Vol. 12 no. 3, pp.257-278. Mullins, D. (2011) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: Case Study Report – Housing Partnerships and Consortia in Northern Ireland, Birmingham: Third Sector Research Centre. Mullins, D. Czischke, D. and van Bortel, G. (2012) Exploring the meaning of hybridity and social enterprise in housing organisations. Housing Studies 27, 4: 405-417. Mullins, D. and Pawson, H. (2010) ‘Housing associations: agents of policy or profits in disguise?’ in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges or Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Mullins, D., Rhodes, M.L. & Williamson, A. (2001) ‘Organisational Fields and Third Sector Housing in Ireland, North and South’, Voluntas Vol. 12 no. 3:.257-278. NCVO, (2012) The UK Civil Society Almanac, London: National Council for Voluntary Organisations. NIAO (2010) Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector. Belfast: Northern Ireland Audit Office. NIAO (2009) General Report by the Comptroller and Auditor General for Northern Ireland 2009, Belfast: Northern Ireland Audit Office. NIAO (2012) Department of Finance and Personnel – Collaborative Procurement and Aggregated Demand, Belfast: Northern Ireland Audit Office. NICVA (2012) State of the Sector VI, Belfast: Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action NIE (2012) Programme for Government 2011-15, Belfast: Northern Ireland Executive. NIE (2012) Programme for Government 2011-15, Belfast: Northern Ireland Executive. NIHE (2001) North Belfast Housing Partnership: Partnership Working Agreement, Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. NIHE (2005) Northern Ireland Supporting People strategy 2005-10. Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. NIHE (2012) Northern Ireland Supporting People strategy 2011-15. Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. NIHE (2012a) Northern Ireland Housing Market: Review and Perspectives 2012-15, Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. NIHE (2012b) Homelessness Strategy for Northern Ireland 2012-17, Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. Nolan, P. (2012) Northern Ireland Peace Monitoring Report, Number one, Belfast: Community Relations Council. North Harbour Consulting (2012) Strategic Review of Supported Accommodation Schemes for Homeless People in Northern Ireland funded by the Supporting People Programme. Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. PAC NI 2012 Report on Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector, Belfast: Northern Ireland Assembly. Parr, S. (2010) The Role of Social Housing in the ‘Care and Control’ of Tenants with Mental Health Problems, Social Policy and Society, 9 (1) 111-122. Power, M. (1997) The Audit Society: Rituals of Verification. Oxford University Press PriceWaterhouseCoopers (2010) Review of Northern Ireland Housing Associations’ Reserves, Belfast: Northern Ireland Assembly Research and Library Services. PriceWaterhouseCoopers (2011) Fundamental review of the NI NIHE. Belfast: Northern Ireland Assembly Research and Library Services Rees, J., Mullins, D. and Bovaird, T. (2012) Partnership Working, TSRC Working Paper 88, Birmingham: Third Sector Research Centre/ University of Birmingham. Rees, J., Mullins, D. and Bovaird, T. (2012a) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: an evidence review. TSRC Working Paper 60. University of Birmingham. Rees, J. Mullins, D. Bovaird, T. ( 2012b) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: Principles, Models and Trends: Exploration of Organisational and Sector Case Studies TSRC Final Project Report. University of Birmingham. Sacranie, H. (2012) Hybridity Enacted in a Large English Housing Association: A Tale of Strategy, Culture and Community Investment. . Housing Studies 27, 4: 533-552. Smith, S. R. (2010) Hybridization and nonprofit organisations: The governance challenge. Policy and Society 29 (2010) 219–229. Teasdale, S. (2012) Negotiating tensions: How do Social Enterprises in the Homelessness Field Balance Social and Commercial Considerations? . Housing Studies 27, 4: 514-532. Strategic Forum for Construction (2002) Accelerating Change, London: Construction Industry Council. Turner and Townsend Consulting (2011) Procurement in the Affordable Housing Sector, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government Tsemberis, S. Gulcur, L. and Nakae, M. (2004) Housing First, Consumer Choice, and Harm Reduction for Homeless Individuals With a Dual Diagnosis. American Journal of Public Health: April 2004, Vol. 94, No. 4, pp. 651-656. Zimmeck, M. (2010) The Compact 10 years on: government's approach to partnership with the voluntary and community sector in England. Voluntary Sector Review, Volume 1, Number 1, March 2010: 125-133(9).",
    year = "2013",
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    }

    Mullins, D, Muir, J & Acheson, N 2013, Third Sector Housing Partnerships in Northern Ireland.

    Third Sector Housing Partnerships in Northern Ireland. / Mullins, David; Muir, Jenny; Acheson, Nick.

    2013. 65 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

    TY - BOOK

    T1 - Third Sector Housing Partnerships in Northern Ireland

    AU - Mullins, David

    AU - Muir, Jenny

    AU - Acheson, Nick

    N1 - Reference text: Acheson, N. (2010) ‘Welfare State reform and restructuring relations between the state and the voluntary sector: Reflections on Northern Ireland evidence’, Voluntary Sector Review 1 (2); Acheson, N. (2011) Hybridization in Complex Policy Fields: a Case Study of ‘SP’ in Northern Ireland, Paper presented at the National Council for Voluntary Organisations/Voluntary Sector Studies Network conference, London. Billis, D. (2010) ‘Towards a Theory of Hybrid Organisations’ in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges for Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Billis, D., H. Glennerster (1998) ‘Human Services and the Voluntary Sector’, Journal of Social Policy 27 (1) 79-98 Birrell, D. (2009) The Impact of Devolution on Social Policy, Bristol: The Policy Press. Blessing, A. (2012) ‘Magical or Monstrous? Hybridity in Social Housing Governance’, Housing Studies 27(2): 189-207. Bratt, R. (2012) The Quadruple Bottom Line and NonProfit Housing Organisations in the United States. Housing Studies 27, 4: 438-456. Buckingham, H. (2009) Competition and contracts in the voluntary sector: exploring the implications for homelessness support providers in Southampton. Policy and Politics 37.2 pp 235-254. Buckingham H. (2011) Hybridity, diversity and the division of labour in the third sector: what can we learn from homelessness organisations in the UK?. Voluntary Sector Review 2.2: 157-175. Cabinet Office (2005) Better regulation - from design to delivery (annual report 2005) Better Regulation Taskforce ". London , Cabinet Office Card, P. (2009) Governance and Accountability in collaborative working models: a case study of social housing procurement consortia in Wales, Paper presented to the ISA International Housing Conference, University of Glasgow, September 1st – 4th 2009. Carr, H. (2005) ‘‘Some-one to Watch over me’: Making Supported Housing Work’, Social and Legal Studies 14, 387-408. Clarke, J., J. Newman, N. Smith, E. Vidler, L. Westmarland (2008) Creating Citizen Consumers, London, Thousand Oaks CA: Sage Publications. Deakin, N (1996) Commission on the Future of the Voluntary Sector. London. De Bruijn, H and ten Heuvelhof, E (2008) Management in Networks. On Multi-actor decision making. London, Routledge. Devine, P., G. Kelly, G. Robinson (2011) An Age of Change? Community Relations in Northern Ireland, ARK Research Update 72, Belfast: ARK. DFP NI (2012) Memorandum on the Third Report of the Public Accounts Committee: Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector, Belfast: Department of Finance and Personnel. DETR (1998) Rethinking Construction: the report of the construction task force (Egan Report), London: Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions. DFP (2011) Public Procurement: a guide for social economy enterprises, Procurement Guidance Note 01/11, Belfast: Department of Finance and Personnel Central Procurement Directorate. DFP (2012a) Northern Ireland Public Procurement Policy (version 8), Belfast: Department of Finance and Personnel Central Procurement Directorate. DFP (2012b) Public Procurement: a guide for small and medium-sized enterprises Procurement Guidance Note 02/12, Belfast: Department of Finance and Personnel Central Procurement Directorate. DHSSSP (2005) A Strategic Framework for Adult Mental Health Services, Belfast: Department for Health, Social Services and Public Safety. DHSSSP (2007) Promoting the Social Inclusion of People with a Mental Health Problem or a Learning Disability, Belfast: Department for Health, Social Services and Public Safety. DSD (2008) Procurement Strategy for the Social Housing Development Programme, Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSD (2012a) Facing the Future: Northern Ireland Housing Strategy 2012-17 Consultation Document, Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSD (2012b) Inspection of Helm Housing Association Round 2 Final Report, Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSDNI (2011a) Concordat between the Voluntary and Community Sector and the Northern Ireland Government, Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSDNI (2011b) Evaluation of the Impact of the Supporting People Policy and its administration. Belfast: Department for Social Development. DSDNI (2012) Northern Ireland Supporting People Guidance, Belfast: Department for Social Development. Giddens, A (1998) The Third Way: The Renewal of Social Democracy. Cambridge, Polity. Gray, A.M., D. Birrell (2012) ‘Coalition Government and Northern Ireland: Social Policy and the Lowest Common Denominator Thesis’, Social Policy and Society 11 (1) 15-26. Hampton, P (2005) Reducing administrative burdens: effective inspection and enforcement. London, Dpeartment for Business, Innovation and Skills Harris, M. (2010) Third Sector Organisations in a Contradictory Policy Environment in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges for Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Hood C, Scott C, James O, Jones G W, Travers A (1999) Regulation Inside Government. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK. Horgan, G., A.M.Gray (2012) ‘Devolution in Northern Ireland: a Lost Opportunity?’, Critical Social Policy 32 (3) 467-478. Housemark Cymru (2007) Welsh Housing Association Consortia: Overcoming the barriers, Coventry: Housemark Cymru. Kerlin J.A. (2006) Social Enterprise in the United States and Europe: Understanding and Learning from the Differences. Voluntas 17: 247-263. Lupton, M. and Kent-Smith, J. (2012) Does Size Matter? Or does culture drive value for money? Coventry: Chartered Institute of Housing. Macmillan, R. (2011) ‘Seeing things differently? The promise of qualitative longitudinal research on the third sector’, TSRC Working Paper 56. McClelland, J. (2012) Maximising the Impact of Welsh Procurement Policy, Cardiff: Welsh Assembly Government. Minkoff, D. (2002). The emergence of hybrid organisational forms: Combining identity based service provision and political action. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 31, 377–401. Muir, J. (2012) Policy difference and policy ownership under UK devolution: social housing policy in Northern Ireland, ISEP Working Paper 5, Belfast: Institute of Spatial and Environmental Planning, Queen’s University Belfast. Muir, J. and Mullins, D. (2012) The governance of change: Procurement of social housing in Northern Ireland. Housing Studies Association Conference, York, April 2012. Mullins, D. and Craig, L. (2005) Testing the Climate: Mergers and Alliances in the housing association sector, London: National Housing Federation. Mullins, D. with Acheson, N. and Muir, J. (2012) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: Housing Partnerships and Consortia in Northern Ireland, Birmingham: Third Sector Research Centre/ University of Birmingham. Mullins, D., Rhodes, M.L. & Williamson, A. (2001) ‘Organizational Fields and Third Sector Housing in Ireland, North and South’, Voluntas Vol. 12 no. 3, pp.257-278. Mullins, D. (2011) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: Case Study Report – Housing Partnerships and Consortia in Northern Ireland, Birmingham: Third Sector Research Centre. Mullins, D. Czischke, D. and van Bortel, G. (2012) Exploring the meaning of hybridity and social enterprise in housing organisations. Housing Studies 27, 4: 405-417. Mullins, D. and Pawson, H. (2010) ‘Housing associations: agents of policy or profits in disguise?’ in Billis, D. (ed.) Hybrid Organisations and the Third Sector: Challenges or Practice, Theory and Policy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Mullins, D., Rhodes, M.L. & Williamson, A. (2001) ‘Organisational Fields and Third Sector Housing in Ireland, North and South’, Voluntas Vol. 12 no. 3:.257-278. NCVO, (2012) The UK Civil Society Almanac, London: National Council for Voluntary Organisations. NIAO (2010) Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector. Belfast: Northern Ireland Audit Office. NIAO (2009) General Report by the Comptroller and Auditor General for Northern Ireland 2009, Belfast: Northern Ireland Audit Office. NIAO (2012) Department of Finance and Personnel – Collaborative Procurement and Aggregated Demand, Belfast: Northern Ireland Audit Office. NICVA (2012) State of the Sector VI, Belfast: Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action NIE (2012) Programme for Government 2011-15, Belfast: Northern Ireland Executive. NIE (2012) Programme for Government 2011-15, Belfast: Northern Ireland Executive. NIHE (2001) North Belfast Housing Partnership: Partnership Working Agreement, Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. NIHE (2005) Northern Ireland Supporting People strategy 2005-10. Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. NIHE (2012) Northern Ireland Supporting People strategy 2011-15. Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. NIHE (2012a) Northern Ireland Housing Market: Review and Perspectives 2012-15, Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. NIHE (2012b) Homelessness Strategy for Northern Ireland 2012-17, Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. Nolan, P. (2012) Northern Ireland Peace Monitoring Report, Number one, Belfast: Community Relations Council. North Harbour Consulting (2012) Strategic Review of Supported Accommodation Schemes for Homeless People in Northern Ireland funded by the Supporting People Programme. Belfast: Northern Ireland NIHE. PAC NI 2012 Report on Creating Effective Partnerships between Government and the Voluntary and Community Sector, Belfast: Northern Ireland Assembly. Parr, S. (2010) The Role of Social Housing in the ‘Care and Control’ of Tenants with Mental Health Problems, Social Policy and Society, 9 (1) 111-122. Power, M. (1997) The Audit Society: Rituals of Verification. Oxford University Press PriceWaterhouseCoopers (2010) Review of Northern Ireland Housing Associations’ Reserves, Belfast: Northern Ireland Assembly Research and Library Services. PriceWaterhouseCoopers (2011) Fundamental review of the NI NIHE. Belfast: Northern Ireland Assembly Research and Library Services Rees, J., Mullins, D. and Bovaird, T. (2012) Partnership Working, TSRC Working Paper 88, Birmingham: Third Sector Research Centre/ University of Birmingham. Rees, J., Mullins, D. and Bovaird, T. (2012a) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: an evidence review. TSRC Working Paper 60. University of Birmingham. Rees, J. Mullins, D. Bovaird, T. ( 2012b) Third Sector Partnerships for Service Delivery: Principles, Models and Trends: Exploration of Organisational and Sector Case Studies TSRC Final Project Report. University of Birmingham. Sacranie, H. (2012) Hybridity Enacted in a Large English Housing Association: A Tale of Strategy, Culture and Community Investment. . Housing Studies 27, 4: 533-552. Smith, S. R. (2010) Hybridization and nonprofit organisations: The governance challenge. Policy and Society 29 (2010) 219–229. Teasdale, S. (2012) Negotiating tensions: How do Social Enterprises in the Homelessness Field Balance Social and Commercial Considerations? . Housing Studies 27, 4: 514-532. Strategic Forum for Construction (2002) Accelerating Change, London: Construction Industry Council. Turner and Townsend Consulting (2011) Procurement in the Affordable Housing Sector, Edinburgh: The Scottish Government Tsemberis, S. Gulcur, L. and Nakae, M. (2004) Housing First, Consumer Choice, and Harm Reduction for Homeless Individuals With a Dual Diagnosis. American Journal of Public Health: April 2004, Vol. 94, No. 4, pp. 651-656. Zimmeck, M. (2010) The Compact 10 years on: government's approach to partnership with the voluntary and community sector in England. Voluntary Sector Review, Volume 1, Number 1, March 2010: 125-133(9).

    PY - 2013/8/5

    Y1 - 2013/8/5

    N2 - This study was commissioned by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive (NIHE) to build on existing work on third sector partnerships undertaken by the Third Sector Research Centre (TSRC) (Rees at al 2012 a and b). The main focus of this work was on partnership structures, drivers and barriers, processes impacts and learning from partnership working.Work on Northern Ireland housing partnerships was undertaken by the University of Ulster and Queen’s University Belfast in partnership with TSRC. This focused on case studies of social housing Procurement Groups (PGs) and Supporting People (SP) Partnerships. The former included case studies of two of the three PGs between 2011 and 2012, while the latter focused on two community based schemes with mental health and homeless service users. These are examples of ‘mandated partnerships’ linked to public procurement and commissioning processes with several layers of regulation. As such these provide examples of the construction of “auditable organisations’ where effectiveness is influenced by relationships external to the partnerships. The report therefore places particular emphasis on procurement, commissioning and regulation to understand the drivers of these partnerships and to a large extent their structure, operation and effectiveness.The report uses the term hybridity to describe organisations that have a mixture of state, market and private sector characteristics; partly as a result of their origins and mission and partly in response to external drivers. State policy influences include the Concordat between the Voluntary and Community Sector and the Northern Ireland Government, (Department for Social Development (DSDNI) 2011) as well as procurement and regulatory drivers outlined above. Market influences include commercial and business plan drivers that affect the relationship between housing associations (HAs) and support providers in SP partnerships. Third Sector influences involve civil society roots and independence from the state and may also include legitimacy and trust, professionalism and the key advantage for HAs of their borrowing being treated as non-government for the purpose of public accounts.The unifying feature of the two case studies is that they concern voluntary and community sector organisations delivering public services. Taken together the two programmes considered here (the Social Housing Development Programme and the SP Programme) account for around half of total Government funding to the Voluntary and Community sector in NI. Moreover, these are both fields in which voluntary and community providers have a long-standing dominance for several reasons. In one case because of substitution for NIHE as developers of new social housing to exploit the borrowing advantages of HAs, in the other because of the comparative advantage of the voluntary and community sector in social care, building on community roots, legitimacy and professionalism.While delivery of services by voluntary and community sector organisations has a number of advantages as set out above, there are also perceived disadvantages from the perspective of public procurement. Independence is seen as reducing scope for public control, their limited scale and resources as reducing ability to bear risk and enable scale economies and on occasions a perceived lack of professionalism. A mirror image set of disadvantages arise from the perspective of voluntary and community organisations themselves including potential loss of independence and sacrifice of mission for mandate. The Concordat referred to above was an attempt to balance these positions, but is generally less influential than procurement and commissioning in establishing relationships between Government and voluntary and community providers of public services.

    AB - This study was commissioned by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive (NIHE) to build on existing work on third sector partnerships undertaken by the Third Sector Research Centre (TSRC) (Rees at al 2012 a and b). The main focus of this work was on partnership structures, drivers and barriers, processes impacts and learning from partnership working.Work on Northern Ireland housing partnerships was undertaken by the University of Ulster and Queen’s University Belfast in partnership with TSRC. This focused on case studies of social housing Procurement Groups (PGs) and Supporting People (SP) Partnerships. The former included case studies of two of the three PGs between 2011 and 2012, while the latter focused on two community based schemes with mental health and homeless service users. These are examples of ‘mandated partnerships’ linked to public procurement and commissioning processes with several layers of regulation. As such these provide examples of the construction of “auditable organisations’ where effectiveness is influenced by relationships external to the partnerships. The report therefore places particular emphasis on procurement, commissioning and regulation to understand the drivers of these partnerships and to a large extent their structure, operation and effectiveness.The report uses the term hybridity to describe organisations that have a mixture of state, market and private sector characteristics; partly as a result of their origins and mission and partly in response to external drivers. State policy influences include the Concordat between the Voluntary and Community Sector and the Northern Ireland Government, (Department for Social Development (DSDNI) 2011) as well as procurement and regulatory drivers outlined above. Market influences include commercial and business plan drivers that affect the relationship between housing associations (HAs) and support providers in SP partnerships. Third Sector influences involve civil society roots and independence from the state and may also include legitimacy and trust, professionalism and the key advantage for HAs of their borrowing being treated as non-government for the purpose of public accounts.The unifying feature of the two case studies is that they concern voluntary and community sector organisations delivering public services. Taken together the two programmes considered here (the Social Housing Development Programme and the SP Programme) account for around half of total Government funding to the Voluntary and Community sector in NI. Moreover, these are both fields in which voluntary and community providers have a long-standing dominance for several reasons. In one case because of substitution for NIHE as developers of new social housing to exploit the borrowing advantages of HAs, in the other because of the comparative advantage of the voluntary and community sector in social care, building on community roots, legitimacy and professionalism.While delivery of services by voluntary and community sector organisations has a number of advantages as set out above, there are also perceived disadvantages from the perspective of public procurement. Independence is seen as reducing scope for public control, their limited scale and resources as reducing ability to bear risk and enable scale economies and on occasions a perceived lack of professionalism. A mirror image set of disadvantages arise from the perspective of voluntary and community organisations themselves including potential loss of independence and sacrifice of mission for mandate. The Concordat referred to above was an attempt to balance these positions, but is generally less influential than procurement and commissioning in establishing relationships between Government and voluntary and community providers of public services.

    M3 - Commissioned report

    BT - Third Sector Housing Partnerships in Northern Ireland

    ER -

    Mullins D, Muir J, Acheson N. Third Sector Housing Partnerships in Northern Ireland. 2013. 65 p.