Thermal Energy Storage in Building Integrated Thermal Systems: A review. Part 1. Active storage systems

Lidia Navarro, Alvaro de Gracia, Shane Colclough, Maria Browne, Sarah McCormack, Philip Griffiths, Luisa Cabeza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Energy consumed by heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems (HVAC) in buildings represents an important part of the global energy consumed in Europe. Thermal energy storage is considered as a promising technology to improve the energy efficiency of these systems, and if incorporated in the building envelope the energy demand can be reduced. Many studies are on applications of thermal energy storage in buildings, but few consider their integration in the building. The inclusion of thermal storage in a functional and constructive way could promote these systems in the commercial and residential building sector, as well as providing user-friendly tools to architects and engineers to help implementation at the design stage. The aim of this paper is to review and identify thermal storage building integrated systems and to classify them depending on the location of the thermal storage system.
LanguageEnglish
Pages526-547
JournalRenewable Energy
Volume88
Early online date27 Nov 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016

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Thermal energy
Energy storage
Air conditioning
Ventilation
Energy efficiency
Heating
Engineers
Hot Temperature

Keywords

  • Thermal energy storage (TES)
  • Building integration
  • Active system
  • Phase change materials (PCM)
  • Thermal mass

Cite this

Navarro, Lidia ; de Gracia, Alvaro ; Colclough, Shane ; Browne, Maria ; McCormack, Sarah ; Griffiths, Philip ; Cabeza, Luisa. / Thermal Energy Storage in Building Integrated Thermal Systems: A review. Part 1. Active storage systems. In: Renewable Energy. 2016 ; Vol. 88. pp. 526-547.
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Thermal Energy Storage in Building Integrated Thermal Systems: A review. Part 1. Active storage systems. / Navarro, Lidia; de Gracia, Alvaro; Colclough, Shane; Browne, Maria; McCormack, Sarah; Griffiths, Philip; Cabeza, Luisa.

In: Renewable Energy, Vol. 88, 04.2016, p. 526-547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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