The use of physical restraints as a safety measure in the care of older people in four rehabilitation wards: findings from an exploratory study

R Gallinagh, R Nevin, D Mc Ilroy, F Mitchell, L Campbell, R Ludwick, Hugh McKenna

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Abstract

We investigated the prevalence and type of physical restraint used with older persons on four rehabilitation wards in Northern Ireland. A longitudinal observational approach was used. One hundred and two patients were observed on four occasions over a three-day period. Most of the patients (68%) were subjected to some form of physical restraint, side-rails being the most commonly observed method. Those who were restrained were dependent on nursing care to meet their needs and received more drugs than those whose mobility was not restricted. No association was found between restraint use and nursing staffing levels, nor was there any association with the incidence of falls. Nurses rationalised their use of restraint as being linked to wandering and patient protection in cases of confusional type behaviours. An association was found between stroke and the maintenance of positional support through the use of restraints (side-rails and screw-on tabletops). Approximately, one-third of those restrained had this noted in their care plans, with concomitant evidence of patient/family involvement in the restraining decision. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
LanguageEnglish
Pages147-156
JournalInternational Journal of Nursing Studies
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2002

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Physical Restraint
Rehabilitation
Safety
Northern Ireland
Nursing Care
Nursing
Stroke
Nurses
Maintenance
Incidence
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Cite this

Gallinagh, R ; Nevin, R ; Mc Ilroy, D ; Mitchell, F ; Campbell, L ; Ludwick, R ; McKenna, Hugh. / The use of physical restraints as a safety measure in the care of older people in four rehabilitation wards: findings from an exploratory study. 2002 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 147-156.
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The use of physical restraints as a safety measure in the care of older people in four rehabilitation wards: findings from an exploratory study. / Gallinagh, R; Nevin, R; Mc Ilroy, D; Mitchell, F; Campbell, L; Ludwick, R; McKenna, Hugh.

Vol. 39, No. 2, 02.2002, p. 147-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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