THE UK MILITARY IN IRAQ: EFFORTS AND PROSPECT FOR ACCOUNTABILITY FOR INTERNATIONAL CRIMES ALLEGATIONS?

Carla Ferstman, Thomas Obel Hansen, Noora Arajärvi

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This research has been carried out in order to contribute to public debate about the adequacy of the official response relating to allegations of serious abuses perpetrated by the UK military during the Iraq war and occupation, also taking into account the ongoing International Criminal Court (ICC) preliminary examination concerning these allegations. The research has focused on reviewing and assessing the steps taken domestically to promote (or obstruct) accountability and developing recommendations regarding any accountability deficits concerning alleged abuses perpetrated by the UK military in Iraq. In our research we have considered the decision-making processes and rationales given for keeping open or closing domestic criminal investigations and not pursuing prosecutions, as well as decisions to transfer matters to inquiry processes in lieu of criminal processes; procedural and regulatory aspects relating to the few military investigations and related procedures which remain open and their progress; rulings of civil courts with oversight over certain matters relevant to the investigations; any lacunae in UK legislation as well as issues relating to the UK Government’s cooperation with the preliminary examination of the ICC Prosecutor and analysis of the ICC Prosecutor’s policy statements and practice regarding the concepts of complementarity, where relevant to the Iraq preliminary examination.
LanguageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

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International Criminal Court
Iraq
Military
offense
responsibility
examination
abuse
civil court
prosecution
decision-making process
deficit
occupation
legislation

Cite this

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title = "THE UK MILITARY IN IRAQ: EFFORTS AND PROSPECT FOR ACCOUNTABILITY FOR INTERNATIONAL CRIMES ALLEGATIONS?",
abstract = "This research has been carried out in order to contribute to public debate about the adequacy of the official response relating to allegations of serious abuses perpetrated by the UK military during the Iraq war and occupation, also taking into account the ongoing International Criminal Court (ICC) preliminary examination concerning these allegations. The research has focused on reviewing and assessing the steps taken domestically to promote (or obstruct) accountability and developing recommendations regarding any accountability deficits concerning alleged abuses perpetrated by the UK military in Iraq. In our research we have considered the decision-making processes and rationales given for keeping open or closing domestic criminal investigations and not pursuing prosecutions, as well as decisions to transfer matters to inquiry processes in lieu of criminal processes; procedural and regulatory aspects relating to the few military investigations and related procedures which remain open and their progress; rulings of civil courts with oversight over certain matters relevant to the investigations; any lacunae in UK legislation as well as issues relating to the UK Government’s cooperation with the preliminary examination of the ICC Prosecutor and analysis of the ICC Prosecutor’s policy statements and practice regarding the concepts of complementarity, where relevant to the Iraq preliminary examination.",
author = "Carla Ferstman and Hansen, {Thomas Obel} and Noora Araj{\"a}rvi",
year = "2018",
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}

THE UK MILITARY IN IRAQ: EFFORTS AND PROSPECT FOR ACCOUNTABILITY FOR INTERNATIONAL CRIMES ALLEGATIONS? / Ferstman, Carla; Hansen, Thomas Obel; Arajärvi, Noora.

2018.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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AU - Hansen, Thomas Obel

AU - Arajärvi, Noora

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