The tension between worker safety and organization survival

Mark Pagell, Mary Parkinson, Anthony Veltri, John Gray, Frank Wiengarten, Michalis Louis, Brian Fynes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This research addresses the fundamental question of whether providing a safe workplace improves or hinders organizational survival, because there are conflicting predictions on the relationship between worker safety and organizational performance. The results, based on a unique longitudinal database covering over 100,000 organizations across 25 years in the U.S. state of Oregon, indicate that in general organizations that provide a safe workplace have significantly lower odds and length of survival. Additionally, the organizations that would in general have better survival odds, benefit most from not providing a safe workplace. This suggests that relying on the market does not engender workplace safety.
LanguageEnglish
JournalManagement Science
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 20 Dec 2019

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Safety
Work place
Workers
Workplace safety
Organizational performance
Safety performance
Prediction
Oregon
Data base
U.S. States

Cite this

Pagell, M., Parkinson, M., Veltri, A., Gray, J., Wiengarten, F., Louis, M., & Fynes, B. (Accepted/In press). The tension between worker safety and organization survival. Management Science.
Pagell, Mark ; Parkinson, Mary ; Veltri, Anthony ; Gray, John ; Wiengarten, Frank ; Louis, Michalis ; Fynes, Brian. / The tension between worker safety and organization survival. In: Management Science. 2019.
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Pagell, M, Parkinson, M, Veltri, A, Gray, J, Wiengarten, F, Louis, M & Fynes, B 2019, 'The tension between worker safety and organization survival', Management Science.

The tension between worker safety and organization survival. / Pagell, Mark; Parkinson, Mary; Veltri, Anthony; Gray, John; Wiengarten, Frank; Louis, Michalis; Fynes, Brian.

In: Management Science, 20.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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AU - Parkinson, Mary

AU - Veltri, Anthony

AU - Gray, John

AU - Wiengarten, Frank

AU - Louis, Michalis

AU - Fynes, Brian

PY - 2019/12/20

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N2 - This research addresses the fundamental question of whether providing a safe workplace improves or hinders organizational survival, because there are conflicting predictions on the relationship between worker safety and organizational performance. The results, based on a unique longitudinal database covering over 100,000 organizations across 25 years in the U.S. state of Oregon, indicate that in general organizations that provide a safe workplace have significantly lower odds and length of survival. Additionally, the organizations that would in general have better survival odds, benefit most from not providing a safe workplace. This suggests that relying on the market does not engender workplace safety.

AB - This research addresses the fundamental question of whether providing a safe workplace improves or hinders organizational survival, because there are conflicting predictions on the relationship between worker safety and organizational performance. The results, based on a unique longitudinal database covering over 100,000 organizations across 25 years in the U.S. state of Oregon, indicate that in general organizations that provide a safe workplace have significantly lower odds and length of survival. Additionally, the organizations that would in general have better survival odds, benefit most from not providing a safe workplace. This suggests that relying on the market does not engender workplace safety.

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Pagell M, Parkinson M, Veltri A, Gray J, Wiengarten F, Louis M et al. The tension between worker safety and organization survival. Management Science. 2019 Dec 20.