The role of stress, peer influence and education levels on the smoking behaviour of nurses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking kills yet a substantial number of qualified nurses continue to smoke. Stress, peer influence and education levels have been cited as influencing prevalence levels among nurses. A self-completed questionnaire was used to survey qualified nurses' perceptions of smoking prevalence, attitudes, and reasons for smoking. The respondents were composed of a random sample (n = 1074) of qualified nurses employed in Northern Ireland. Results show that 25.8% of the sample smoked. Factors influencing smoking behaviour and reasons for continuing smoking are explored. This paper discusses the implications of these findings for nursing and nurses' health promotion activities. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
LanguageEnglish
Pages359-366
JournalInternational Journal of Nursing Studies
Volume40
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - May 2003

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Smoking
Nurses
Education
Northern Ireland
Health Promotion
Smoke
Nursing
Peer Influence
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

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title = "The role of stress, peer influence and education levels on the smoking behaviour of nurses",
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The role of stress, peer influence and education levels on the smoking behaviour of nurses. / McKenna, Hugh; Slater, P; McCance, Tanya; Bunting, Brendan; Spiers, A; McElwee, G.

Vol. 40, No. 4, 05.2003, p. 359-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Smoking kills yet a substantial number of qualified nurses continue to smoke. Stress, peer influence and education levels have been cited as influencing prevalence levels among nurses. A self-completed questionnaire was used to survey qualified nurses' perceptions of smoking prevalence, attitudes, and reasons for smoking. The respondents were composed of a random sample (n = 1074) of qualified nurses employed in Northern Ireland. Results show that 25.8% of the sample smoked. Factors influencing smoking behaviour and reasons for continuing smoking are explored. This paper discusses the implications of these findings for nursing and nurses' health promotion activities. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

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