The Relationship between Youth Identity and Spatial Perception within the Context of Religious Architecture in Northern Ireland.

Karen McPhillips, Jenny Russell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The relationship between religious buildings and the shaping of young people’s identitiesis one which has received little investigation. Northern Ireland is a region which has experienced a religious divide for many years and provides an interesting setting on which to examine concepts associated with religion, youth, place, and spatial perception of architecture as an aspect of identity.Religion is an important part of life in Northern Ireland and religious buildings have played a vital role in shaping modern society by providing spaces for young people to learn about their faith and culture. This study investigated how young people from different religious backgrounds perceived certain elements of place, religion and identity, in particular, how they interpreted and negotiated the spatial layout of religious buildings and perceived the relationship between the space and the religion itself. The study endeavoured to promote the cross cultural understanding of young people's perceptions of religion and architecture and provide further clarity into the cultural and social distinctions between young teenagers of conflicting religions. An insight was gained through the analysis of non-textualmaterial such as drawings and art-work developed from young people. This paper lays out the key findings of this study, identifying architectural concepts that are fundamental to the production of different religious places in Northern Ireland and examines the impacts of religious places, through spatial experience, and their conceptual architectural configurations, on young people’s perceptions, ideas and understanding of religion. The main religions of Northern Ireland, Catholicism and Protestantism, along with the minority religions of Judaism, Islam and Hinduism, were examined.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages97-114
    JournalInternational Journal of the Constructed Environment
    Volume1
    Publication statusPublished - 25 May 2011

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    Northern Ireland
    Religion
    Spatial Perception
    Religious Architecture
    Religious Buildings
    Layout
    Clarity
    Fundamental
    Catholicism
    Judaism
    Faith
    Hinduism
    Teenagers
    Minorities
    Modernity
    Cross-cultural Understanding
    Works of Art
    Islam
    Protestantism

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The relationship between religious buildings and the shaping of young people’s identitiesis one which has received little investigation. Northern Ireland is a region which has experienced a religious divide for many years and provides an interesting setting on which to examine concepts associated with religion, youth, place, and spatial perception of architecture as an aspect of identity.Religion is an important part of life in Northern Ireland and religious buildings have played a vital role in shaping modern society by providing spaces for young people to learn about their faith and culture. This study investigated how young people from different religious backgrounds perceived certain elements of place, religion and identity, in particular, how they interpreted and negotiated the spatial layout of religious buildings and perceived the relationship between the space and the religion itself. The study endeavoured to promote the cross cultural understanding of young people's perceptions of religion and architecture and provide further clarity into the cultural and social distinctions between young teenagers of conflicting religions. An insight was gained through the analysis of non-textualmaterial such as drawings and art-work developed from young people. This paper lays out the key findings of this study, identifying architectural concepts that are fundamental to the production of different religious places in Northern Ireland and examines the impacts of religious places, through spatial experience, and their conceptual architectural configurations, on young people’s perceptions, ideas and understanding of religion. The main religions of Northern Ireland, Catholicism and Protestantism, along with the minority religions of Judaism, Islam and Hinduism, were examined.",
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    The Relationship between Youth Identity and Spatial Perception within the Context of Religious Architecture in Northern Ireland. / McPhillips, Karen; Russell, Jenny.

    In: International Journal of the Constructed Environment, Vol. 1, 25.05.2011, p. 97-114.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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