The perceptions and experiences of Taiwanese parents who have children with intellectual disability.

Meiying Chang, Roy McConkey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    31 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Most research into family care-giving has been undertaken in western, English-speakingsocieties with little cognisance taken of possible differences across cultures. Home-basedinterviews were conducted with 117 mothers and fathers in Taipei City, Taiwan and five main themes were identified using content analysis. Three themes expressed the impact of the child on family functioning, parental health, and levels of stress and two themes described parents’ coping strategies and sources of support. Although these themes broadly replicate findings from other cultures, certain features of Taiwanese–Chinese society appear to accentuate the impact on mothers especially of having a child with an intellectual disability. The implications for the provision of family-centred services are discussed, especially in helping parents to recognise their strengths and coping capabilities, and to promote their influence in changing cultural attitudes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)27-41
    JournalInternational Journal of Disability, Development and Education
    Volume55
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

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