The Northern Ireland Conflict Related Artefacts Database

Kristian Brown, Mike McCool

Research output: Non-textual formSoftware

Abstract

The conflict in and about Northern Ireland has generated a large body of material culture that can be used to examine and explore issues of conflict, division, identity and memory. The Institute of Irish Studies at Queen’s University Belfast, and Healing through Remembering, undertook a joint two year programme to survey collections of these conflict related artefacts, and record them on a publicly accessible database. Artefacts were numerous and included arms and equipment, clothing, flags and banners, audio and video recordings, artworks and crafts, photographs, and printed ephemera. Both institutional and private collections were audited. The resulting Northern Ireland Conflict Related Artefacts Database consists of comprehensive descriptions of collections, recording details of content, background and access. It will serve to inform people about the type of conflict related material that is currently held in collections, and will act as a gateway to the relevant holdings of curatorial institutions, for interested researchers from a wide range of backgrounds. By flagging artefact collections it will also help ensure that this material is not lost to posterity, in the years to come. It is also hoped that the database will stimulate interest and promote debate about the development of a Living Memorial Museum.
LanguageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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title = "The Northern Ireland Conflict Related Artefacts Database",
abstract = "The conflict in and about Northern Ireland has generated a large body of material culture that can be used to examine and explore issues of conflict, division, identity and memory. The Institute of Irish Studies at Queen’s University Belfast, and Healing through Remembering, undertook a joint two year programme to survey collections of these conflict related artefacts, and record them on a publicly accessible database. Artefacts were numerous and included arms and equipment, clothing, flags and banners, audio and video recordings, artworks and crafts, photographs, and printed ephemera. Both institutional and private collections were audited. The resulting Northern Ireland Conflict Related Artefacts Database consists of comprehensive descriptions of collections, recording details of content, background and access. It will serve to inform people about the type of conflict related material that is currently held in collections, and will act as a gateway to the relevant holdings of curatorial institutions, for interested researchers from a wide range of backgrounds. By flagging artefact collections it will also help ensure that this material is not lost to posterity, in the years to come. It is also hoped that the database will stimulate interest and promote debate about the development of a Living Memorial Museum.",
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The Northern Ireland Conflict Related Artefacts Database. Brown, Kristian (Author); McCool, Mike (Author). 2008.

Research output: Non-textual formSoftware

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AU - McCool, Mike

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