The long-term psychological impact of Bloody Sunday on families of the victims as measured by The Revised Impact of Event Scale

Mark Shevlin, K McGuigan

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19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. In 1972, 13 civil rights marchers were killed in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, on what is known as Bloody Sunday. This study aimed to assess the psychological impact of this event on the families of victims as measured by the Revised Impact of Event Scale. Design. Cross-sectional self-report based study. Methods. The Impact of Event Scale Revised was administered to 72 members of the families (immediate family, children of immediate family, cousins, and second cousins) of those killed on Bloody Sunday. Results. High levels of intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal were found. In addition, significant group differences were found. Those family members closest to the victims reported the highest levels of psychological distress. Conclusion. The findings were discussed within the transgenerational trauma context.
LanguageEnglish
Pages427-432
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Psychology
Volume42
Issue numberPart 4
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2003

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Psychology
Northern Ireland
Civil Rights
Self Report
Wounds and Injuries

Cite this

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title = "The long-term psychological impact of Bloody Sunday on families of the victims as measured by The Revised Impact of Event Scale",
abstract = "Objectives. In 1972, 13 civil rights marchers were killed in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, on what is known as Bloody Sunday. This study aimed to assess the psychological impact of this event on the families of victims as measured by the Revised Impact of Event Scale. Design. Cross-sectional self-report based study. Methods. The Impact of Event Scale Revised was administered to 72 members of the families (immediate family, children of immediate family, cousins, and second cousins) of those killed on Bloody Sunday. Results. High levels of intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal were found. In addition, significant group differences were found. Those family members closest to the victims reported the highest levels of psychological distress. Conclusion. The findings were discussed within the transgenerational trauma context.",
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AB - Objectives. In 1972, 13 civil rights marchers were killed in Londonderry, Northern Ireland, on what is known as Bloody Sunday. This study aimed to assess the psychological impact of this event on the families of victims as measured by the Revised Impact of Event Scale. Design. Cross-sectional self-report based study. Methods. The Impact of Event Scale Revised was administered to 72 members of the families (immediate family, children of immediate family, cousins, and second cousins) of those killed on Bloody Sunday. Results. High levels of intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal were found. In addition, significant group differences were found. Those family members closest to the victims reported the highest levels of psychological distress. Conclusion. The findings were discussed within the transgenerational trauma context.

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