The legacy of Conflict in Northern Ireland: Paramilitarism, Violence and YouthWork in Contested Spaces

Ken Harland

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    Since the early 1970’s, the Youth Service in Northern Ireland has attempted to respond to the needs of young people within a context of extremely difficult and contested socio-economic and political circumstances. As our society emerges from a period of prolonged violence, old fears and traditions are still prevalent. Violence and paramilitarism has left its legacy and there remain real threats and dangers. The delivery of youth work in Northern Ireland faces both new challenges and new opportunities. This paper provides a context for the conflict in Northern Ireland and demonstrates the potential and value of youth work in contested spaces.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationWork with Youth in Divided and Contested Societies
    Pages1-335
    Publication statusPublished - 22 Sep 2007

    Fingerprint

    youth work
    violence
    threat
    anxiety
    economics
    Values
    Society

    Keywords

    • youth work in contested spaces
    • violence
    • paramilitarism

    Cite this

    Harland, K. (2007). The legacy of Conflict in Northern Ireland: Paramilitarism, Violence and YouthWork in Contested Spaces. In Work with Youth in Divided and Contested Societies (pp. 1-335)
    Harland, Ken. / The legacy of Conflict in Northern Ireland: Paramilitarism, Violence and YouthWork in Contested Spaces. Work with Youth in Divided and Contested Societies. 2007. pp. 1-335
    @inbook{00757f38fa4641ad9cb92c24dafccc3c,
    title = "The legacy of Conflict in Northern Ireland: Paramilitarism, Violence and YouthWork in Contested Spaces",
    abstract = "Since the early 1970’s, the Youth Service in Northern Ireland has attempted to respond to the needs of young people within a context of extremely difficult and contested socio-economic and political circumstances. As our society emerges from a period of prolonged violence, old fears and traditions are still prevalent. Violence and paramilitarism has left its legacy and there remain real threats and dangers. The delivery of youth work in Northern Ireland faces both new challenges and new opportunities. This paper provides a context for the conflict in Northern Ireland and demonstrates the potential and value of youth work in contested spaces.",
    keywords = "youth work in contested spaces, violence, paramilitarism",
    author = "Ken Harland",
    note = "Reference text: Amir, Y. (1969) Contact Hypothesis in Ethnic Relations. Psychological Bulletin, 71: 319-42. Amir, Y. (1976) The role of intergroup contact in change of prejudice and ethnic relations. In Katz, P.A. (Ed) Towards the elimination of Racism. Oxford: Pergamon. Bloomer, F. and Weinreich, P. (2003) Cross Community Relations Projects and Interdependence Identities. In Hargie, O. and Dickson, D. (Eds) Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives on the Northern Ireland Conflict. London: Mainstream Publishing. Church, C. and Shouldice, J. (2003) The evaluation of Conflict Resolution: Part 11. Emerging practice and theory. INCORE Publications. Connolly, P. (1998) Early years, anit-sectarian television – Guidelines for a series of television programmes directed at anti-sectarian work with children in their early years. Community Relations Council. Department of Education (2003) Youth Work: A model for effective practice. Update 2003. Department for Education, Northern Ireland. Fay, M., Morrissey, M and Smyth, M. (1999) Northern Ireland’s Troubles The Human Costs London: Pluto Press. Feenan, D. (2002) Community Justice in Conflict: paramilitary punishment in Northern Ireland. In Feenan, D. Informal Criminal Justice. Ferguson, N and Cairns, E. (1996) ‘Political Violence and Moral Maturity in Northern Ireland.’ Political Psychology, 17: 713-725. Geraghty, T., Breakey, C. and Keane, T. (1998) A Sense of Belonging: Young People in rural areas of Northern Ireland speak about their needs, hopes and aspirations. Youth Action Northern Ireland: Youth Action Publishers. Gordon, D. (2003) Police Service Northern Ireland. First Constables Annual Report. Harland, K. (2000) Men and Masculinity: The construction of masculine identities in inner city Belfast. PhD. submitted to the University of Ulster. Harland, K. (2001) The Challenges and potential of developing a more effective youth work curriculum with young men. Journal of Child Care Practice Vol 7 No. 4 Harland, K. Morgan, T. Muldoon, O. (2005) The Nature of Youth Work in Northern Ireland: Purpose, Contribution and Challenges. Research Report Commissioned by the Department of Education in partnership between the University of Ulster and Queen’s University, Belfast. Jarman, N. and O’Halloran, C. (2001) ‘Recreational Rioting: Young People, interface areas and violence.’ Child Care in Practice, 7 (1): 2-16. JEDI (2002) A Framework for Reflection in Practice. Guidelines for embedding EDI principles in youth work practice. JEDI Publications. JEDI (2003) Placing the values of Equity, Diversity and Interdependence at the core of plicy and operations. Document One. JEDI Publications. Kelly, D. (2003) A Study of the development of personal and social education and citizenship in a college setting. Undergraduate thesis submitted to University of Ulster. Kennedy, L. (2004) Broken bodies, Silenced Voices: the paramilitary abuse of children in Northern Ireland. Save the Children / Queens University Belfast publications. McEvoy, K. (1998) Crime and Punishment. Cited in Anderstown News, July. Morrow, D., Eyben, K., and Wilson, D. (2003) From the margin to the middle: Taking equity, diversity and interdependence seriously. In Hargie, O. and Dickson, D. (Eds) Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives on the Northern Ireland Conflict. London: Mainstream Publishing. Neins, U., Cairns, E., and Hewstone, M. (2003) Contact and Conflict in Northern Ireland. In Hargie, O. and Dickson, D. (Eds) Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives on the Northern Ireland Conflict. London: Mainstream Publishing. Northern Ireland Voluntary Trust. (June, 1999) Empowering Young Adults: Lessons from the Unattached Youth programme. Northern Ireland Voluntary Trust Briefing Paper. 1986, 1997) Pettigrew, T.F. (1986) The intergroup contact hypothesis reconsidered. In Hewstone, M. and Brown, R. (Eds) Contact and Conflict in Intergroup Encounters. Oxford: Blackwell. Pettigrew, T.F. (1997) Generalized intergroup contact effects on prejudice. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 23:173-85. Smyth, M., Hamilton, J and Thomson, K. (2001) ‘Age and generational politics in Northern Ireland’s Troubles and their consequences for justice and peace.’ Paper to the British and Irish Social Policy Association’s Annual Conference: Belfast: July 2001. Smith, A. (1996) Education for Democratic citizenship. Consultation Meting, Strasbourg, June 1996. Cited in Kelly, D. (2003) A Study of the development of personal and social education and citizenship in a college setting. Undergraduate thesis submitted to University of Ulster. Smyth, M and Hamilton, J. (2003) The Human Costs of the Troubles. In Hargie, O. and Dickson, D. (Eds) Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives on the Northern Ireland Conflict. London: Mainstream Publishing. Smyth, M and Scott, M. (2000) The Youthquest 2000 Survey. INCORE Derry Londonderry. Smyth, P. (2000) Working with Children and young People in Violently Divided societies papers from South Africa and Northern Ireland. In Smyth, M & Thompson, K. (Eds) (2001) Community Conflict Impact on Children. Incore: Belfast. Wilson, D. and Morrow, D. (1988) Supporting Community Youth Workers in a Contested Society. The Understanding Conflict Trust. Wilson, D. and Tyrrell, J. (1995) Institutions for conciliation and mediation. In Dunn, S (Ed) Facets of the conflict in Northern Ireland. London: St. Martin. Young People Now (2004) Modern Folk Devils. National Youth Agency Publications (January). p14-15. YouthAction Northern Ireland (2002) Everyday Life: Young men, violence and developing youth work practice in Northern Ireland. YouthAction Publications. Youth Council for Northern Ireland. (1993) Participation: Youth Work Curriculum Guidelines. Youth Council for Northern Ireland Publishers. (p9-10) Youth Council for Northern Ireland. (1998) Benefits of the Youth Service: A study of the experiences of 14-18 year old members of registered youth groups in Northern Ireland. Youth Council for Northern Ireland Publications",
    year = "2007",
    month = "9",
    day = "22",
    language = "English",
    isbn = "90-8790-024-4",
    pages = "1--335",
    booktitle = "Work with Youth in Divided and Contested Societies",

    }

    Harland, K 2007, The legacy of Conflict in Northern Ireland: Paramilitarism, Violence and YouthWork in Contested Spaces. in Work with Youth in Divided and Contested Societies. pp. 1-335.

    The legacy of Conflict in Northern Ireland: Paramilitarism, Violence and YouthWork in Contested Spaces. / Harland, Ken.

    Work with Youth in Divided and Contested Societies. 2007. p. 1-335.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    TY - CHAP

    T1 - The legacy of Conflict in Northern Ireland: Paramilitarism, Violence and YouthWork in Contested Spaces

    AU - Harland, Ken

    N1 - Reference text: Amir, Y. (1969) Contact Hypothesis in Ethnic Relations. Psychological Bulletin, 71: 319-42. Amir, Y. (1976) The role of intergroup contact in change of prejudice and ethnic relations. In Katz, P.A. (Ed) Towards the elimination of Racism. Oxford: Pergamon. Bloomer, F. and Weinreich, P. (2003) Cross Community Relations Projects and Interdependence Identities. In Hargie, O. and Dickson, D. (Eds) Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives on the Northern Ireland Conflict. London: Mainstream Publishing. Church, C. and Shouldice, J. (2003) The evaluation of Conflict Resolution: Part 11. Emerging practice and theory. INCORE Publications. Connolly, P. (1998) Early years, anit-sectarian television – Guidelines for a series of television programmes directed at anti-sectarian work with children in their early years. Community Relations Council. Department of Education (2003) Youth Work: A model for effective practice. Update 2003. Department for Education, Northern Ireland. Fay, M., Morrissey, M and Smyth, M. (1999) Northern Ireland’s Troubles The Human Costs London: Pluto Press. Feenan, D. (2002) Community Justice in Conflict: paramilitary punishment in Northern Ireland. In Feenan, D. Informal Criminal Justice. Ferguson, N and Cairns, E. (1996) ‘Political Violence and Moral Maturity in Northern Ireland.’ Political Psychology, 17: 713-725. Geraghty, T., Breakey, C. and Keane, T. (1998) A Sense of Belonging: Young People in rural areas of Northern Ireland speak about their needs, hopes and aspirations. Youth Action Northern Ireland: Youth Action Publishers. Gordon, D. (2003) Police Service Northern Ireland. First Constables Annual Report. Harland, K. (2000) Men and Masculinity: The construction of masculine identities in inner city Belfast. PhD. submitted to the University of Ulster. Harland, K. (2001) The Challenges and potential of developing a more effective youth work curriculum with young men. Journal of Child Care Practice Vol 7 No. 4 Harland, K. Morgan, T. Muldoon, O. (2005) The Nature of Youth Work in Northern Ireland: Purpose, Contribution and Challenges. Research Report Commissioned by the Department of Education in partnership between the University of Ulster and Queen’s University, Belfast. Jarman, N. and O’Halloran, C. (2001) ‘Recreational Rioting: Young People, interface areas and violence.’ Child Care in Practice, 7 (1): 2-16. JEDI (2002) A Framework for Reflection in Practice. Guidelines for embedding EDI principles in youth work practice. JEDI Publications. JEDI (2003) Placing the values of Equity, Diversity and Interdependence at the core of plicy and operations. Document One. JEDI Publications. Kelly, D. (2003) A Study of the development of personal and social education and citizenship in a college setting. Undergraduate thesis submitted to University of Ulster. Kennedy, L. (2004) Broken bodies, Silenced Voices: the paramilitary abuse of children in Northern Ireland. Save the Children / Queens University Belfast publications. McEvoy, K. (1998) Crime and Punishment. Cited in Anderstown News, July. Morrow, D., Eyben, K., and Wilson, D. (2003) From the margin to the middle: Taking equity, diversity and interdependence seriously. In Hargie, O. and Dickson, D. (Eds) Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives on the Northern Ireland Conflict. London: Mainstream Publishing. Neins, U., Cairns, E., and Hewstone, M. (2003) Contact and Conflict in Northern Ireland. In Hargie, O. and Dickson, D. (Eds) Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives on the Northern Ireland Conflict. London: Mainstream Publishing. Northern Ireland Voluntary Trust. (June, 1999) Empowering Young Adults: Lessons from the Unattached Youth programme. Northern Ireland Voluntary Trust Briefing Paper. 1986, 1997) Pettigrew, T.F. (1986) The intergroup contact hypothesis reconsidered. In Hewstone, M. and Brown, R. (Eds) Contact and Conflict in Intergroup Encounters. Oxford: Blackwell. Pettigrew, T.F. (1997) Generalized intergroup contact effects on prejudice. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 23:173-85. Smyth, M., Hamilton, J and Thomson, K. (2001) ‘Age and generational politics in Northern Ireland’s Troubles and their consequences for justice and peace.’ Paper to the British and Irish Social Policy Association’s Annual Conference: Belfast: July 2001. Smith, A. (1996) Education for Democratic citizenship. Consultation Meting, Strasbourg, June 1996. Cited in Kelly, D. (2003) A Study of the development of personal and social education and citizenship in a college setting. Undergraduate thesis submitted to University of Ulster. Smyth, M and Hamilton, J. (2003) The Human Costs of the Troubles. In Hargie, O. and Dickson, D. (Eds) Researching the Troubles: Social Science Perspectives on the Northern Ireland Conflict. London: Mainstream Publishing. Smyth, M and Scott, M. (2000) The Youthquest 2000 Survey. INCORE Derry Londonderry. Smyth, P. (2000) Working with Children and young People in Violently Divided societies papers from South Africa and Northern Ireland. In Smyth, M & Thompson, K. (Eds) (2001) Community Conflict Impact on Children. Incore: Belfast. Wilson, D. and Morrow, D. (1988) Supporting Community Youth Workers in a Contested Society. The Understanding Conflict Trust. Wilson, D. and Tyrrell, J. (1995) Institutions for conciliation and mediation. In Dunn, S (Ed) Facets of the conflict in Northern Ireland. London: St. Martin. Young People Now (2004) Modern Folk Devils. National Youth Agency Publications (January). p14-15. YouthAction Northern Ireland (2002) Everyday Life: Young men, violence and developing youth work practice in Northern Ireland. YouthAction Publications. Youth Council for Northern Ireland. (1993) Participation: Youth Work Curriculum Guidelines. Youth Council for Northern Ireland Publishers. (p9-10) Youth Council for Northern Ireland. (1998) Benefits of the Youth Service: A study of the experiences of 14-18 year old members of registered youth groups in Northern Ireland. Youth Council for Northern Ireland Publications

    PY - 2007/9/22

    Y1 - 2007/9/22

    N2 - Since the early 1970’s, the Youth Service in Northern Ireland has attempted to respond to the needs of young people within a context of extremely difficult and contested socio-economic and political circumstances. As our society emerges from a period of prolonged violence, old fears and traditions are still prevalent. Violence and paramilitarism has left its legacy and there remain real threats and dangers. The delivery of youth work in Northern Ireland faces both new challenges and new opportunities. This paper provides a context for the conflict in Northern Ireland and demonstrates the potential and value of youth work in contested spaces.

    AB - Since the early 1970’s, the Youth Service in Northern Ireland has attempted to respond to the needs of young people within a context of extremely difficult and contested socio-economic and political circumstances. As our society emerges from a period of prolonged violence, old fears and traditions are still prevalent. Violence and paramilitarism has left its legacy and there remain real threats and dangers. The delivery of youth work in Northern Ireland faces both new challenges and new opportunities. This paper provides a context for the conflict in Northern Ireland and demonstrates the potential and value of youth work in contested spaces.

    KW - youth work in contested spaces

    KW - violence

    KW - paramilitarism

    M3 - Chapter

    SN - 90-8790-024-4

    SP - 1

    EP - 335

    BT - Work with Youth in Divided and Contested Societies

    ER -

    Harland K. The legacy of Conflict in Northern Ireland: Paramilitarism, Violence and YouthWork in Contested Spaces. In Work with Youth in Divided and Contested Societies. 2007. p. 1-335