The Interaction between Predator Strategy and Prey Competition in a pair of Multi-Predator Multi-Prey Lattices

Gavin Abernethy, Mark McCartney, David H. Glass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A computational study of a system of ten prey phenotypes and either one or ten predator phenotypes with a range offoraging behaviours, arranged on two separate one-dimensional lattices, is presented. Mutation between nearest neighboursalong the prey lattice occurs at a constant rate, and mutation may or may not be enabled for the predators. The signi canceof competition amongst the prey is investigated by testing a variety of distributions of the relative intraspeci c andinterspeci c competition. We also study the inuence this has on the survival and population size of predator phenotypeswith a variety of foraging strategies. Our results indicate that the distribution of competition amongst prey is of littlesigni cance, provided that intraspeci c is stronger than the interspeci c, and that it is typically preferable for a predatorto adopt a foraging strategy that scales linearly with prey population sizes if it is alone. In an environment of multiplepredator phenotypes, the least or most-focused predators are most likely to persist, dependent on the feeding parameter.
LanguageEnglish
Pages9-33
JournalCommunications in Nonlinear Science and Numerical Simulation
Volume56
Early online date27 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Jul 2017

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Predator
Prey
Phenotype
Interaction
Foraging
Population Size
Mutation
Rate Constant
Testing
Linearly
Likely
Strategy
Dependent
Range of data

Keywords

  • computational ecology
  • nonlinear systems
  • coupled map lattices

Cite this

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title = "The Interaction between Predator Strategy and Prey Competition in a pair of Multi-Predator Multi-Prey Lattices",
abstract = "A computational study of a system of ten prey phenotypes and either one or ten predator phenotypes with a range offoraging behaviours, arranged on two separate one-dimensional lattices, is presented. Mutation between nearest neighboursalong the prey lattice occurs at a constant rate, and mutation may or may not be enabled for the predators. The signi canceof competition amongst the prey is investigated by testing a variety of distributions of the relative intraspeci c andinterspeci c competition. We also study the inuence this has on the survival and population size of predator phenotypeswith a variety of foraging strategies. Our results indicate that the distribution of competition amongst prey is of littlesigni cance, provided that intraspeci c is stronger than the interspeci c, and that it is typically preferable for a predatorto adopt a foraging strategy that scales linearly with prey population sizes if it is alone. In an environment of multiplepredator phenotypes, the least or most-focused predators are most likely to persist, dependent on the feeding parameter.",
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N2 - A computational study of a system of ten prey phenotypes and either one or ten predator phenotypes with a range offoraging behaviours, arranged on two separate one-dimensional lattices, is presented. Mutation between nearest neighboursalong the prey lattice occurs at a constant rate, and mutation may or may not be enabled for the predators. The signi canceof competition amongst the prey is investigated by testing a variety of distributions of the relative intraspeci c andinterspeci c competition. We also study the inuence this has on the survival and population size of predator phenotypeswith a variety of foraging strategies. Our results indicate that the distribution of competition amongst prey is of littlesigni cance, provided that intraspeci c is stronger than the interspeci c, and that it is typically preferable for a predatorto adopt a foraging strategy that scales linearly with prey population sizes if it is alone. In an environment of multiplepredator phenotypes, the least or most-focused predators are most likely to persist, dependent on the feeding parameter.

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