THE INFLUENCE OF ONSET SOUND LEVEL OF TEST STIMULUS ON REPORTED MAGNITUDE OF CHANGING-LOUDNESS AFTEREFFECTS

Anthony Reinhardt-Rutland

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    An increasing-loudness aftereffect follows adaptation to a tone of decreasing sound level; a decreasing-loudness aftereffect follows adaptation to a tone of increasing sound level. Contrary to the belief that sensory processing contributes to these changing-loudness aftereffects, evidence suggests that onset sound level of test stimulus may have little influence on reported aftereffects. This was tested formally in the present study. Adapting stimuli and test stimuli all employed 1-kHz sinusoidal carriers:;Three onset sound levels of test stimuli were well within the range of sound levels encompassed by adapting stimuli; a fourth was set at the highest value of this range. Consistent with previous evidence, substantial aftereffects were reported for all the midrange onset sound levels, with little difference across onset sound levels. However, for the high-range onset sound level, reported aftereffects were severely attenuated. Sensory processing can be invoked by supposing that aftereffect mechanisms `'tap'' neural activity that encodes adapting sound levels.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages295-303
    JournalJournal of General Psychology
    Volume122
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 1995

    Cite this

    @article{fdc40a4aab164d06ab156ddc45a6c6ab,
    title = "THE INFLUENCE OF ONSET SOUND LEVEL OF TEST STIMULUS ON REPORTED MAGNITUDE OF CHANGING-LOUDNESS AFTEREFFECTS",
    abstract = "An increasing-loudness aftereffect follows adaptation to a tone of decreasing sound level; a decreasing-loudness aftereffect follows adaptation to a tone of increasing sound level. Contrary to the belief that sensory processing contributes to these changing-loudness aftereffects, evidence suggests that onset sound level of test stimulus may have little influence on reported aftereffects. This was tested formally in the present study. Adapting stimuli and test stimuli all employed 1-kHz sinusoidal carriers:;Three onset sound levels of test stimuli were well within the range of sound levels encompassed by adapting stimuli; a fourth was set at the highest value of this range. Consistent with previous evidence, substantial aftereffects were reported for all the midrange onset sound levels, with little difference across onset sound levels. However, for the high-range onset sound level, reported aftereffects were severely attenuated. Sensory processing can be invoked by supposing that aftereffect mechanisms `'tap'' neural activity that encodes adapting sound levels.",
    author = "Anthony Reinhardt-Rutland",
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    volume = "122",
    pages = "295--303",
    journal = "Journal of General Psychology",
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    }

    THE INFLUENCE OF ONSET SOUND LEVEL OF TEST STIMULUS ON REPORTED MAGNITUDE OF CHANGING-LOUDNESS AFTEREFFECTS. / Reinhardt-Rutland, Anthony.

    In: Journal of General Psychology, Vol. 122, No. 3, 07.1995, p. 295-303.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    N2 - An increasing-loudness aftereffect follows adaptation to a tone of decreasing sound level; a decreasing-loudness aftereffect follows adaptation to a tone of increasing sound level. Contrary to the belief that sensory processing contributes to these changing-loudness aftereffects, evidence suggests that onset sound level of test stimulus may have little influence on reported aftereffects. This was tested formally in the present study. Adapting stimuli and test stimuli all employed 1-kHz sinusoidal carriers:;Three onset sound levels of test stimuli were well within the range of sound levels encompassed by adapting stimuli; a fourth was set at the highest value of this range. Consistent with previous evidence, substantial aftereffects were reported for all the midrange onset sound levels, with little difference across onset sound levels. However, for the high-range onset sound level, reported aftereffects were severely attenuated. Sensory processing can be invoked by supposing that aftereffect mechanisms `'tap'' neural activity that encodes adapting sound levels.

    AB - An increasing-loudness aftereffect follows adaptation to a tone of decreasing sound level; a decreasing-loudness aftereffect follows adaptation to a tone of increasing sound level. Contrary to the belief that sensory processing contributes to these changing-loudness aftereffects, evidence suggests that onset sound level of test stimulus may have little influence on reported aftereffects. This was tested formally in the present study. Adapting stimuli and test stimuli all employed 1-kHz sinusoidal carriers:;Three onset sound levels of test stimuli were well within the range of sound levels encompassed by adapting stimuli; a fourth was set at the highest value of this range. Consistent with previous evidence, substantial aftereffects were reported for all the midrange onset sound levels, with little difference across onset sound levels. However, for the high-range onset sound level, reported aftereffects were severely attenuated. Sensory processing can be invoked by supposing that aftereffect mechanisms `'tap'' neural activity that encodes adapting sound levels.

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