The impact of staff training on special educational needs professionals’ attitudes toward and understanding of applied behavior analysis

Sinéad Smyth, Benjamin E Reading, Claire McDowell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Research-based evidence points to the efficacy and value of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in meeting the needs of individuals with learning disabilities and autism. Nonetheless, public, government, and professional perception of ABA can be negative. The current study was designed to measure the impact of a short intervention on professionals’ attitudes toward, and knowledge of, ABA. Method: Teachers and classroom assistants from two separate schools for children with severe learning difficulties completed a self-report survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward ABA. They were then presented with a 90-min training module designed to increase their knowledge of the history of ABA and their functional assessment skills. Following training, the self- report was readministered. Results: The mean scores for each group increased only after the training had been delivered. Discussion and conclusions: Further research is needed to address the impact of training on classroom practice.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-11
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disabilities
Volumen/a
Early online date9 Nov 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 9 Nov 2017

Fingerprint

Self Report
Learning Disorders
Autistic Disorder
Research
History
Applied Behavior Analysis
Learning
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Applied behavior analysis (ABA)
  • staff training
  • attitudes
  • knowledge

Cite this

@article{0952946747f345caab4d49fcc27ecaf9,
title = "The impact of staff training on special educational needs professionals’ attitudes toward and understanding of applied behavior analysis",
abstract = "Background: Research-based evidence points to the efficacy and value of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in meeting the needs of individuals with learning disabilities and autism. Nonetheless, public, government, and professional perception of ABA can be negative. The current study was designed to measure the impact of a short intervention on professionals’ attitudes toward, and knowledge of, ABA. Method: Teachers and classroom assistants from two separate schools for children with severe learning difficulties completed a self-report survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward ABA. They were then presented with a 90-min training module designed to increase their knowledge of the history of ABA and their functional assessment skills. Following training, the self- report was readministered. Results: The mean scores for each group increased only after the training had been delivered. Discussion and conclusions: Further research is needed to address the impact of training on classroom practice.",
keywords = "Applied behavior analysis (ABA), staff training, attitudes, knowledge",
author = "Sin{\'e}ad Smyth and Reading, {Benjamin E} and Claire McDowell",
note = "UIR Compliant - evidence uploaded to other files",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1177/1744629517739160",
language = "English",
volume = "n/a",
pages = "1--11",
journal = "Journal of Intellectual Disabilities",
issn = "1744-6295",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of staff training on special educational needs professionals’ attitudes toward and understanding of applied behavior analysis

AU - Smyth, Sinéad

AU - Reading, Benjamin E

AU - McDowell, Claire

N1 - UIR Compliant - evidence uploaded to other files

PY - 2017/11/9

Y1 - 2017/11/9

N2 - Background: Research-based evidence points to the efficacy and value of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in meeting the needs of individuals with learning disabilities and autism. Nonetheless, public, government, and professional perception of ABA can be negative. The current study was designed to measure the impact of a short intervention on professionals’ attitudes toward, and knowledge of, ABA. Method: Teachers and classroom assistants from two separate schools for children with severe learning difficulties completed a self-report survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward ABA. They were then presented with a 90-min training module designed to increase their knowledge of the history of ABA and their functional assessment skills. Following training, the self- report was readministered. Results: The mean scores for each group increased only after the training had been delivered. Discussion and conclusions: Further research is needed to address the impact of training on classroom practice.

AB - Background: Research-based evidence points to the efficacy and value of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in meeting the needs of individuals with learning disabilities and autism. Nonetheless, public, government, and professional perception of ABA can be negative. The current study was designed to measure the impact of a short intervention on professionals’ attitudes toward, and knowledge of, ABA. Method: Teachers and classroom assistants from two separate schools for children with severe learning difficulties completed a self-report survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward ABA. They were then presented with a 90-min training module designed to increase their knowledge of the history of ABA and their functional assessment skills. Following training, the self- report was readministered. Results: The mean scores for each group increased only after the training had been delivered. Discussion and conclusions: Further research is needed to address the impact of training on classroom practice.

KW - Applied behavior analysis (ABA)

KW - staff training

KW - attitudes

KW - knowledge

U2 - 10.1177/1744629517739160

DO - 10.1177/1744629517739160

M3 - Article

VL - n/a

SP - 1

EP - 11

JO - Journal of Intellectual Disabilities

T2 - Journal of Intellectual Disabilities

JF - Journal of Intellectual Disabilities

SN - 1744-6295

ER -