The impact of prostate cancer on the partners of those diagnosed with the condition: Preliminary findings

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Background
Due to constantly improving treatment techniques, 80% of men treated for prostate cancer can expect to live for 10 years or more beyond their diagnosis. Many men endure long-term side effects from the treatment that have an impact on relationships with their partners.

Previous research has been undertaken with ‘couples’ and interventions have been developed as a result of exploration of the needs of the men with cancer, without examining the impact of the diagnosis and long-term side-effects of treatment on their partners. Female involvement with 'couples’ interventions' has been at the invitation of husbands; women have not been recruited independently.

Aims
This research aims to explore the impact of prostate cancer on the female partners of those with the condition.

Methods
Individual interviews with female partners of men previously treated for prostate cancer were undertaken. Participants were recruited independently of their male partners. A constructivist grounded theory approach was applied that required iterative analysis.

Results
To date 10 women have been interviewed. Preliminary analysis shows that some female partners experience on-going distress as a result of their partners long-term side-effects from treatment. Participants in relationships with men who are many years their senior, report the most serious effects. Some men are not happy for their wives to discuss their condition and therefore would not have opted to take part in ‘couples’ research studies.

Conclusions
Preliminary findings show that older women tend to report coping better with their partners diagnosis and long-term side-effects from prostate cancer treatment. Further recruitment is anticipated.

Conference

ConferenceBritish Psychosocial Oncology Society Annual Conference 2019
Abbreviated titleBPOS Annual Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityChester
Period28/02/191/03/19
Internet address

Fingerprint

Prostatic Neoplasms
Spouses
Research
Therapeutics
Interviews
Neoplasms

Cite this

Gilleece, T., Dunwoody, L., Campbell, C., & Harris, R. (2019). The impact of prostate cancer on the partners of those diagnosed with the condition: Preliminary findings. Poster session presented at British Psychosocial Oncology Society Annual Conference 2019, Chester, United Kingdom.
Gilleece, Terri ; Dunwoody, Lynn ; Campbell, Claire ; Harris, Rachel. / The impact of prostate cancer on the partners of those diagnosed with the condition: Preliminary findings. Poster session presented at British Psychosocial Oncology Society Annual Conference 2019, Chester, United Kingdom.
@conference{8aff87b986a9429c98238fee2ff5c568,
title = "The impact of prostate cancer on the partners of those diagnosed with the condition: Preliminary findings",
abstract = "BackgroundDue to constantly improving treatment techniques, 80{\%} of men treated for prostate cancer can expect to live for 10 years or more beyond their diagnosis. Many men endure long-term side effects from the treatment that have an impact on relationships with their partners. Previous research has been undertaken with ‘couples’ and interventions have been developed as a result of exploration of the needs of the men with cancer, without examining the impact of the diagnosis and long-term side-effects of treatment on their partners. Female involvement with 'couples’ interventions' has been at the invitation of husbands; women have not been recruited independently.AimsThis research aims to explore the impact of prostate cancer on the female partners of those with the condition.MethodsIndividual interviews with female partners of men previously treated for prostate cancer were undertaken. Participants were recruited independently of their male partners. A constructivist grounded theory approach was applied that required iterative analysis.ResultsTo date 10 women have been interviewed. Preliminary analysis shows that some female partners experience on-going distress as a result of their partners long-term side-effects from treatment. Participants in relationships with men who are many years their senior, report the most serious effects. Some men are not happy for their wives to discuss their condition and therefore would not have opted to take part in ‘couples’ research studies.ConclusionsPreliminary findings show that older women tend to report coping better with their partners diagnosis and long-term side-effects from prostate cancer treatment. Further recruitment is anticipated.",
author = "Terri Gilleece and Lynn Dunwoody and Claire Campbell and Rachel Harris",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "28",
language = "English",
note = "British Psychosocial Oncology Society Annual Conference 2019, BPOS Annual Conference ; Conference date: 28-02-2019 Through 01-03-2019",
url = "https://www.bpos.org/events",

}

Gilleece, T, Dunwoody, L, Campbell, C & Harris, R 2019, 'The impact of prostate cancer on the partners of those diagnosed with the condition: Preliminary findings' British Psychosocial Oncology Society Annual Conference 2019, Chester, United Kingdom, 28/02/19 - 1/03/19, .

The impact of prostate cancer on the partners of those diagnosed with the condition: Preliminary findings. / Gilleece, Terri; Dunwoody, Lynn; Campbell, Claire; Harris, Rachel.

2019. Poster session presented at British Psychosocial Oncology Society Annual Conference 2019, Chester, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - The impact of prostate cancer on the partners of those diagnosed with the condition: Preliminary findings

AU - Gilleece, Terri

AU - Dunwoody, Lynn

AU - Campbell, Claire

AU - Harris, Rachel

PY - 2019/2/28

Y1 - 2019/2/28

N2 - BackgroundDue to constantly improving treatment techniques, 80% of men treated for prostate cancer can expect to live for 10 years or more beyond their diagnosis. Many men endure long-term side effects from the treatment that have an impact on relationships with their partners. Previous research has been undertaken with ‘couples’ and interventions have been developed as a result of exploration of the needs of the men with cancer, without examining the impact of the diagnosis and long-term side-effects of treatment on their partners. Female involvement with 'couples’ interventions' has been at the invitation of husbands; women have not been recruited independently.AimsThis research aims to explore the impact of prostate cancer on the female partners of those with the condition.MethodsIndividual interviews with female partners of men previously treated for prostate cancer were undertaken. Participants were recruited independently of their male partners. A constructivist grounded theory approach was applied that required iterative analysis.ResultsTo date 10 women have been interviewed. Preliminary analysis shows that some female partners experience on-going distress as a result of their partners long-term side-effects from treatment. Participants in relationships with men who are many years their senior, report the most serious effects. Some men are not happy for their wives to discuss their condition and therefore would not have opted to take part in ‘couples’ research studies.ConclusionsPreliminary findings show that older women tend to report coping better with their partners diagnosis and long-term side-effects from prostate cancer treatment. Further recruitment is anticipated.

AB - BackgroundDue to constantly improving treatment techniques, 80% of men treated for prostate cancer can expect to live for 10 years or more beyond their diagnosis. Many men endure long-term side effects from the treatment that have an impact on relationships with their partners. Previous research has been undertaken with ‘couples’ and interventions have been developed as a result of exploration of the needs of the men with cancer, without examining the impact of the diagnosis and long-term side-effects of treatment on their partners. Female involvement with 'couples’ interventions' has been at the invitation of husbands; women have not been recruited independently.AimsThis research aims to explore the impact of prostate cancer on the female partners of those with the condition.MethodsIndividual interviews with female partners of men previously treated for prostate cancer were undertaken. Participants were recruited independently of their male partners. A constructivist grounded theory approach was applied that required iterative analysis.ResultsTo date 10 women have been interviewed. Preliminary analysis shows that some female partners experience on-going distress as a result of their partners long-term side-effects from treatment. Participants in relationships with men who are many years their senior, report the most serious effects. Some men are not happy for their wives to discuss their condition and therefore would not have opted to take part in ‘couples’ research studies.ConclusionsPreliminary findings show that older women tend to report coping better with their partners diagnosis and long-term side-effects from prostate cancer treatment. Further recruitment is anticipated.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Gilleece T, Dunwoody L, Campbell C, Harris R. The impact of prostate cancer on the partners of those diagnosed with the condition: Preliminary findings. 2019. Poster session presented at British Psychosocial Oncology Society Annual Conference 2019, Chester, United Kingdom.