The Hopeful Minds programme: a mixed method evaluation of 10 school curriculum based, theoretically framed lessons to promote mental health and coping skills in 8-14 year olds.

Karen Kirby, Aoife Lyons, John Mallett, Kathryn Goetzke, Marie Dunne, Wendy Gibbons, Áine Ní Chnáimhsí. , Jill Ferguson, Tara Harkin, Emily McGlinchey, Grainne McAnee, Myron Belfer, Kirsten Stark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study is the first evaluation of Hopeful Minds: a novel school-based mental health promotion programme designed for children and pre-adolescents. Ten hope theory-based lessons were assessed. A mixed-methodology design was used with a sample of 127 participants (88 pre/post; 39 focus groups), aged 8–13 years. In the pre/post-study, there were significant improvements in anxiety and emotional regulation levels (primary school), coping and resilience levels (post-primary). Focus groups were conducted with three post-primary groups. The key overarching qualitative themes included developing a hopeful mind; increased emotional insight and awareness; improved resilience, confidence, self-belief, and developing new coping skills and a request to provide the programme to all transitioning primary school children. Outcomes provide preliminary evidence indicating that the Hopeful Minds theoretical framework (Snyder, [2000]. Handbook of hope: Theory, measures, and applications. Academic Press.) has potential in preventing the development of mental health issues in pre and early adolescent children. Recommendations include adopting a whole school approach, include additional lessons on rumination and academic failure.

Original languageEnglish
JournalChild Care in Practice
Early online date11 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Nov 2019

Keywords

  • Hope theory
  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health
  • School based
  • Mental Health
  • Promotion and Prevention
  • Coping
  • Resilience
  • Anxiety
  • Emotional regulation
  • hope theory
  • adolescents
  • Mental health
  • coping

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