The Healing Journey: Help Seeking for Self-Injury Among a Community Population

Maggie Long, Roger Manktelow, Anne Tracey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Help seeking is known to be a complex and difficult journey for people who self-injure. In this article, we explore the process of help seeking from the perspective of a group of people living in Northern Ireland with a history of selfinjury. We conducted 10 semistructured interviews and employed a grounded theory approach to data analysis. Wecreated two major categories from the interview transcript data: (a) “involution of feeling,” which depicts participants’perspectives on barriers to help seeking; and (b) “to be treated like a person,” in which participants communicate their experiences of help seeking. The findings pose important implications for policy, practice, theory, and future research,including the need to increase the uptake of follow-up care among people who arrive at hospitals as a result of selfinjury, self-harm, or suicidal behaviors.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-13
JournalQualitative Health Research
VolumeOnline
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Oct 2014

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community
theory-practice
interview
grounded theory
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human being
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The Healing Journey: Help Seeking for Self-Injury Among a Community Population. / Long, Maggie; Manktelow, Roger; Tracey, Anne.

In: Qualitative Health Research, Vol. Online, 08.10.2014, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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