The Grating Resonant Mirror

R Holmes, NJ Goddard, K Singh, B Bastani

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The Resonant Mirror (RM) sensor is an optical waveguide sensor that allows the refractive index, optical absorption or fluorescence of a sample to be monitored. The change in refractive index, absorption or fluorescence can result from chemical, physical or biochemical reactions occurring within typically two hundred nanometres of the waveguide/sample interface. As such, this allows monitoring of affinity reactions, kinetic rate determinations and immunoassay reactions.The sensor chip is fabricated by depositing a low-index spacer layer onto a high-index glass substrate. Finally, a high-index waveguiding layer is deposited onto the spacer layer. The sample is placed in contact with the waveguiding layer. Optical modes in the waveguiding layer are excited by prism coupling, and the effective index of these modes is altered by changes in the refractive index of the sample. This changes the resonance angle which is observed as a change in the position of a peak on a linear detector. To monitor the resonance angle, the standard RM instrument requires the use of crossed polarisers. The polarisers required careful setting up, and must be used with sources containing no infrared, which passes through conventional sheet polarisers unmodified.We describe here an elegant modification of the standard RM, namely the grating RM. By etching the high-index layer into narrow parallel strips, the incident light is caused to diffract. By monitoring the position of the diffracted orders, one can determine the refractive index of the sample. This modification removes the necessity of using polarisers, and thereby simplifies the instrumentation, without affecting the sensitivity of the sensor.In this paper, we present both theoretical and experimental results obtained using the grating RM sensor.
    LanguageEnglish
    Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
    Number of pages12
    Publication statusPublished - 20 Mar 1998
    EventRoyal Society of Chemistry - R&D Topics 1998 - Durham University
    Duration: 20 Mar 1998 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceRoyal Society of Chemistry - R&D Topics 1998
    Period20/03/98 → …

    Fingerprint

    gratings
    mirrors
    polarizers
    sensors
    refractivity
    spacers
    fluorescence
    immunoassay
    optical waveguides
    prisms
    affinity
    strip
    chemical reactions
    reaction kinetics
    optical absorption
    chips
    etching
    waveguides
    glass
    sensitivity

    Cite this

    Holmes, R., Goddard, NJ., Singh, K., & Bastani, B. (1998). The Grating Resonant Mirror. In Unknown Host Publication
    Holmes, R ; Goddard, NJ ; Singh, K ; Bastani, B. / The Grating Resonant Mirror. Unknown Host Publication. 1998.
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    title = "The Grating Resonant Mirror",
    abstract = "The Resonant Mirror (RM) sensor is an optical waveguide sensor that allows the refractive index, optical absorption or fluorescence of a sample to be monitored. The change in refractive index, absorption or fluorescence can result from chemical, physical or biochemical reactions occurring within typically two hundred nanometres of the waveguide/sample interface. As such, this allows monitoring of affinity reactions, kinetic rate determinations and immunoassay reactions.The sensor chip is fabricated by depositing a low-index spacer layer onto a high-index glass substrate. Finally, a high-index waveguiding layer is deposited onto the spacer layer. The sample is placed in contact with the waveguiding layer. Optical modes in the waveguiding layer are excited by prism coupling, and the effective index of these modes is altered by changes in the refractive index of the sample. This changes the resonance angle which is observed as a change in the position of a peak on a linear detector. To monitor the resonance angle, the standard RM instrument requires the use of crossed polarisers. The polarisers required careful setting up, and must be used with sources containing no infrared, which passes through conventional sheet polarisers unmodified.We describe here an elegant modification of the standard RM, namely the grating RM. By etching the high-index layer into narrow parallel strips, the incident light is caused to diffract. By monitoring the position of the diffracted orders, one can determine the refractive index of the sample. This modification removes the necessity of using polarisers, and thereby simplifies the instrumentation, without affecting the sensitivity of the sensor.In this paper, we present both theoretical and experimental results obtained using the grating RM sensor.",
    author = "R Holmes and NJ Goddard and K Singh and B Bastani",
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    Holmes, R, Goddard, NJ, Singh, K & Bastani, B 1998, The Grating Resonant Mirror. in Unknown Host Publication. Royal Society of Chemistry - R&D Topics 1998, 20/03/98.

    The Grating Resonant Mirror. / Holmes, R; Goddard, NJ; Singh, K; Bastani, B.

    Unknown Host Publication. 1998.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    TY - GEN

    T1 - The Grating Resonant Mirror

    AU - Holmes, R

    AU - Goddard, NJ

    AU - Singh, K

    AU - Bastani, B

    PY - 1998/3/20

    Y1 - 1998/3/20

    N2 - The Resonant Mirror (RM) sensor is an optical waveguide sensor that allows the refractive index, optical absorption or fluorescence of a sample to be monitored. The change in refractive index, absorption or fluorescence can result from chemical, physical or biochemical reactions occurring within typically two hundred nanometres of the waveguide/sample interface. As such, this allows monitoring of affinity reactions, kinetic rate determinations and immunoassay reactions.The sensor chip is fabricated by depositing a low-index spacer layer onto a high-index glass substrate. Finally, a high-index waveguiding layer is deposited onto the spacer layer. The sample is placed in contact with the waveguiding layer. Optical modes in the waveguiding layer are excited by prism coupling, and the effective index of these modes is altered by changes in the refractive index of the sample. This changes the resonance angle which is observed as a change in the position of a peak on a linear detector. To monitor the resonance angle, the standard RM instrument requires the use of crossed polarisers. The polarisers required careful setting up, and must be used with sources containing no infrared, which passes through conventional sheet polarisers unmodified.We describe here an elegant modification of the standard RM, namely the grating RM. By etching the high-index layer into narrow parallel strips, the incident light is caused to diffract. By monitoring the position of the diffracted orders, one can determine the refractive index of the sample. This modification removes the necessity of using polarisers, and thereby simplifies the instrumentation, without affecting the sensitivity of the sensor.In this paper, we present both theoretical and experimental results obtained using the grating RM sensor.

    AB - The Resonant Mirror (RM) sensor is an optical waveguide sensor that allows the refractive index, optical absorption or fluorescence of a sample to be monitored. The change in refractive index, absorption or fluorescence can result from chemical, physical or biochemical reactions occurring within typically two hundred nanometres of the waveguide/sample interface. As such, this allows monitoring of affinity reactions, kinetic rate determinations and immunoassay reactions.The sensor chip is fabricated by depositing a low-index spacer layer onto a high-index glass substrate. Finally, a high-index waveguiding layer is deposited onto the spacer layer. The sample is placed in contact with the waveguiding layer. Optical modes in the waveguiding layer are excited by prism coupling, and the effective index of these modes is altered by changes in the refractive index of the sample. This changes the resonance angle which is observed as a change in the position of a peak on a linear detector. To monitor the resonance angle, the standard RM instrument requires the use of crossed polarisers. The polarisers required careful setting up, and must be used with sources containing no infrared, which passes through conventional sheet polarisers unmodified.We describe here an elegant modification of the standard RM, namely the grating RM. By etching the high-index layer into narrow parallel strips, the incident light is caused to diffract. By monitoring the position of the diffracted orders, one can determine the refractive index of the sample. This modification removes the necessity of using polarisers, and thereby simplifies the instrumentation, without affecting the sensitivity of the sensor.In this paper, we present both theoretical and experimental results obtained using the grating RM sensor.

    M3 - Conference contribution

    BT - Unknown Host Publication

    ER -

    Holmes R, Goddard NJ, Singh K, Bastani B. The Grating Resonant Mirror. In Unknown Host Publication. 1998