The future of nurse education: characterised by paradoxes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

According to the World Health Organisation [Health 21: Health for All in the 21st century, 1998], the 21st century offers a bright vision of better health and social care for all. However, the report Healthcare futures 2010 [Welsh Institute for health and Social Care, Pontypridd, 1998] has suggested that the future is far from straightforward and will be characterised by a series of `paradoxes'. These include: the increased emphasis on health promotion and yet the great demand for cure and treatment of illness; public reliance upon professionalism within nursing and yet greater lay assertiveness; and a greater demand for technical competence and the need for `human' qualities linked to the debate around the issue of competency. It is imperative that we examine some of the possible implications of these paradoxes and explicate their effects on the future development of nursing education. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
LanguageEnglish
Pages79-83
JournalNurse Education Today
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2004

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nurse
Nurses
Delivery of Health Care
Education
health
Assertiveness
education
nursing
Nursing Education
Health
Health Promotion
Mental Competency
demand
Nursing
WHO
health promotion
illness
Therapeutics
Professionalism

Cite this

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The future of nurse education: characterised by paradoxes. / McIlfatrick, Sonja.

In: Nurse Education Today, Vol. 24, No. 2, 02.2004, p. 79-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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