The Epidemiology of UK University Football Injuries within the 2011-2012 Season

Daniel Marr, Simon Coleman, Carla McCabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although football is one of the most popular sports worldwide, there have been very few studies on injuries suffered at university level. The aim of this study was to collate a wide range of epidemiological findings representative of the injuries suffered by those who play football at this level; while also comparing those injuries suffered between males and females. An electronic retrospective questionnaire was completed by 183 British University level footballers (males n=99, females n=84) who had sustained an injury during the 2011-12 season. The dominant lower limb (ankle: 29.5%, knee: 19.7%) was found as the most common site of injury occurrence with sprains (36. 6%) and muscle strains (23%) reported as the most common types of injury. University players are most often exposed to risk of injury in the autumnal period (20%), whilst playing a competitive match (58.5%) on a grass surface (66.1%) and the severity of injury is high (44.8%). Males reported more groin/thigh and muscle strain injuries compared to females. This study provides a landscape of information in relation to UK university football injuries. There is a need for an injury surveillance initiative to be implemented prospectively involving team doctors and a database of players’ medical records. This, in combination with the results found in this study, will help produce a better evidence base of the epidemiology of injuries at this level which will pave the way for producing preventative strategies that aim to improve the safety of university football participation.
LanguageEnglish
Pages49-55
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Science
Volume4
Issue number6A
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

Fingerprint

Football
Epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries
Sprains and Strains
Muscles
Groin
Thigh
Poaceae
Ankle
Sports
Medical Records
Lower Extremity
Knee
Databases

Keywords

  • Football
  • Injury
  • Epidemiology
  • University

Cite this

@article{4533d85734b04b8ba5460c876b53dc34,
title = "The Epidemiology of UK University Football Injuries within the 2011-2012 Season",
abstract = "Although football is one of the most popular sports worldwide, there have been very few studies on injuries suffered at university level. The aim of this study was to collate a wide range of epidemiological findings representative of the injuries suffered by those who play football at this level; while also comparing those injuries suffered between males and females. An electronic retrospective questionnaire was completed by 183 British University level footballers (males n=99, females n=84) who had sustained an injury during the 2011-12 season. The dominant lower limb (ankle: 29.5{\%}, knee: 19.7{\%}) was found as the most common site of injury occurrence with sprains (36. 6{\%}) and muscle strains (23{\%}) reported as the most common types of injury. University players are most often exposed to risk of injury in the autumnal period (20{\%}), whilst playing a competitive match (58.5{\%}) on a grass surface (66.1{\%}) and the severity of injury is high (44.8{\%}). Males reported more groin/thigh and muscle strain injuries compared to females. This study provides a landscape of information in relation to UK university football injuries. There is a need for an injury surveillance initiative to be implemented prospectively involving team doctors and a database of players’ medical records. This, in combination with the results found in this study, will help produce a better evidence base of the epidemiology of injuries at this level which will pave the way for producing preventative strategies that aim to improve the safety of university football participation.",
keywords = "Football, Injury, Epidemiology, University",
author = "Daniel Marr and Simon Coleman and Carla McCabe",
note = "Reference text: [1] Federation International Football Association. FIFA Big Count 2006: 270 million people active in football. 2008. [Online].http://www.fifa.com/mm/document/fifafacts/bcoffsurv/bigcount.statspackage_7024.pdf [2] Hawkins RD, Fuller CW. A prospective epidemiological study of injuries in four English professional football clubs. Br J Sports Med 1999; 33: 196-203. [3] Hawkins RD, Hulse MA, Wilkinson C, Hodson A, Gibson M. The association football medical research programme: an audit of injuries in professional football. Br J Sports Med 2001; 35: 43-47. [4] Ekstrand J. Epidemiology of football injuries. Sci Sports 2008; 23: 73-77. [5] Cloke DJ, Spencer S, Hodson A, Deehan D. The epidemiology of ankle injuries occurring in English Football Association academies. Br J Sports Med 2009; 43: 1119-1125. [6] Wald{\'e}n M, H{\"a}gglund M, Ekstrand J. UEFA Champions League study: a prospective study of injuries in professional football during the 2001–2002 season. Br J Sports Med 2005; 39: 542-546. [7] Van Mechelen W, Hlobil H, Kemper HC. Incidence, severity, aetiology and prevention of sports injuries. A review of concepts. Sports Med 1992; 14: 82–99. [8] H{\"a}gglund M, Wald{\'e}n M, Bahr R, Ekstrand, J. Methods for epidemiological study of injuries to professional football players: developing the UEFA model. Br J Sports Med 2005; 39: 340-346. [9] Ekstrand J, H{\"a}gglund M, Wald{\'e}n M. Injury incidence and injury patterns in professional football: the UEFA injury study. Br J Sports Med 201; 45: 553-558. [10] Dvorak J, Junge A, Derman W, Schwellnus M. Injuries and illnesses of football players during the 2010 FIFA World Cup. Br J Sports Med 2011; 45: 626-630. [11] H{\"a}gglund M, Wald{\'e}n M, Ekstrand J. UEFA injury study—an injury audit of European Championships 2006 to 2008. Br J Sports Med 2009; 43: 483-489. [12] Junge A, R{\"o}sch D, Peterson L, Graf-Baumann T, Dvorak, J. Prevention of soccer injuries: a prospective intervention study in youth amateur players. Am J Sports Med 2002; 30: 652-659. [13] Le Gall F, Carling C, Reilly T, Vandewalle H, Church J, Rochcongar P. Incidence of injuries in elite French youth soccer players: a 10-season study. Am J Sports Med 2006; 34: 928-938. [14] Price RJ, Hawkins RD, Hulse MA, Hodson A. The Football Association medical research programme: an audit of injuries in academy youth football. Br J Sports Med 2004; 38: 466-471. [15] H{\"a}gglund M, Wald{\'e}n M, Ekstrand J. Injuries among male and female elite football players. Scand J Med Sci Sports 2009; 19: 819-827. [16] Le Gall F, Carling C, Reilly T. Injuries in young elite female soccer players: an 8-season prospective study. Am J Sports Med 2008; 36: 276-284. [17] British University and College Sport (2013) Annual review 2011-12. [Online].http://www.bucs.org.uk/page.asp?section=9§ionTitle=About+Us [accessed 27 Feb 2014] [18] Survey Monkey (2013) Home [online].http://www.surveymonkey.com/ [Accessed on 18/4/13] [19] Baruch Y, Holtom BC. Survey response rate levels and trends in organizational research. Human Relations 2008; 61: 1139-1160. [20] Madge C, Meek J, Wellens J, Hooley T. Facebook, social integration and informal learning at university: ‘It is more for socialising and talking to friends about work than for actually doing work’. Learning, Media and Technology 2009; 34: 141-155. [21] Gabbe BJ, Finch CF, Bennell KL, Wajswelner H. How valid is a self reported 12 month sports injury history? Br J Sports Med 2003; 37: 545-547. [22] Fordham S, Garbutt G, Lopes P. Epidemiology of injuries in adventure racing athletes. Br J Sports Med 2004; 38: 300-303. [23] Vincent WJ, Weir JP. Statistics in Kinesiology, 4th edn. Human Kinetics, 2012. [24] Faude O, Junge A, Kindermann W, Dvorak J. Risk factors for injuries in elite female soccer players. Br J Sports Med 2006; 40: 785-790. [25] Rahnama N, Reilly T, Lees A. Injury risk associated with playing actions during competitive soccer. Br J Sports Med 2002; 36: 354-359. [26] Nickel C, Zernial O, Musahl V, Hansen U, Zantop T, Petersen W. A prospective study of kitesurfing injuries. Am J Sports Med 2004; 32: 921–927. [27] H{\"a}gglund M, Wald{\'e}n M, Ekstrand J. Previous injury as a risk factor for injury in elite football: a prospective study over two consecutive seasons. British Journal of Sports Medicine 2006; 40: 767-772. [28] White JE, Emery TM, Kane JL, Groves R, Risman AB. Pre-season fitness profiles of professional soccer players. In: Reilly T, Lees A, Davis K, Murphy WJ. Eds. Science and football. London: E & FN Spon, 1988:164-171. [29] Fuller CW, Dick RW, Corlette J, Schmalz R. Comparison of the incidence, nature and cause of injuries sustained on grass and new generation artificial turf by male and female football players. Part 1: match injuries. Br J Sports Med 2007; 41(Suppl 1): i20-26. [30] Fuller CW, Dick RW, Corlette J, Schmalz R. Comparison of the incidence, nature and cause of injuries sustained on grass and new generation artificial turf by male and female football players. Part 2: training injuries. Br J Sports Med 2007; 41(Suppl 1): i27-32. [31] Ekstrand J, Timpka T, H{\"a}gglund M. Risk of injury in elite football played on artificial turf versus natural grass: a prospective two-cohort study. Br J Sports Med 2006; 40: 975-980. [32] Engstr{\"o}m B, Johansson C, Tornkvist H. Soccer injuries among elite female players. Am J Sports Med 1991; 19: 372-375. [33] Arnason A, Sigurdsson SB, Gudmundsson A, Holme I, Engebretsen L, Bahr R. Risk factors for injuries in football. Am J Sports Med 2004; 32(1 suppl): 5S-16S. [34] Estwanik J, Sloane B, Rosenberg M. Groin strain and other possible causes of groin pain. Phys Sportsmed 1990; 18: 55-60. [35] Garret W. Muscle strain injuries. Am J Sports Med 1996; 24: S2-8. [36] Ekstrand J, Hilding J. The incidence and differential diagnosis of acute groin injuries in male soccer players. Scand J Med Sci Sports 1999; 9: 98-103. [37] Tyler TF, Nicholas SJ, Campbell RJ, McHugh MP. The association of hip strength and flexibility with the incidence of adductor muscle strains in professional ice hockey players. Am J Sports Med 2001; 29: 124-128. [38] H{\"o}lmich P, Uhskou P, Ulnits L, Kanstrup IL, Nielsen MB, Bjerg AM, Krogsgaard K. Effectiveness of active physical training as treatment for longstanding adductor-related groin pain in athletes: randomised trial. Lancet 1999; 353: 439-43. [39] Faude O, Junge A, Kindermann W, Dvorak J. Injuries in female soccer players: a prospective study in the German national league. Am J Sports Med 2005; 33: 1694-1700. [40] Bjordal JM, Arnly F, Hannestad B, Strand T. Epidemiology of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in soccer. Am J Sports Med 1997; 25: 341-345. [41] Clausen MB, Zebis MK, M{\o}ller M, Krustrup P, H{\"o}lmich P, Wedderkopp N, Andersen LL, Christensen KB, Thorborg K. High injury incidence in adolescent female soccer. Am J Sports Med 2014 [Ahead of print].",
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The Epidemiology of UK University Football Injuries within the 2011-2012 Season. / Marr, Daniel; Coleman, Simon; McCabe, Carla.

In: International Journal of Sports Science, Vol. 4, No. 6A, 11.2014, p. 49-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Epidemiology of UK University Football Injuries within the 2011-2012 Season

AU - Marr, Daniel

AU - Coleman, Simon

AU - McCabe, Carla

N1 - Reference text: [1] Federation International Football Association. FIFA Big Count 2006: 270 million people active in football. 2008. [Online].http://www.fifa.com/mm/document/fifafacts/bcoffsurv/bigcount.statspackage_7024.pdf [2] Hawkins RD, Fuller CW. A prospective epidemiological study of injuries in four English professional football clubs. Br J Sports Med 1999; 33: 196-203. [3] Hawkins RD, Hulse MA, Wilkinson C, Hodson A, Gibson M. The association football medical research programme: an audit of injuries in professional football. Br J Sports Med 2001; 35: 43-47. [4] Ekstrand J. Epidemiology of football injuries. Sci Sports 2008; 23: 73-77. [5] Cloke DJ, Spencer S, Hodson A, Deehan D. The epidemiology of ankle injuries occurring in English Football Association academies. Br J Sports Med 2009; 43: 1119-1125. [6] Waldén M, Hägglund M, Ekstrand J. UEFA Champions League study: a prospective study of injuries in professional football during the 2001–2002 season. Br J Sports Med 2005; 39: 542-546. [7] Van Mechelen W, Hlobil H, Kemper HC. Incidence, severity, aetiology and prevention of sports injuries. A review of concepts. Sports Med 1992; 14: 82–99. [8] Hägglund M, Waldén M, Bahr R, Ekstrand, J. Methods for epidemiological study of injuries to professional football players: developing the UEFA model. Br J Sports Med 2005; 39: 340-346. [9] Ekstrand J, Hägglund M, Waldén M. Injury incidence and injury patterns in professional football: the UEFA injury study. Br J Sports Med 201; 45: 553-558. [10] Dvorak J, Junge A, Derman W, Schwellnus M. Injuries and illnesses of football players during the 2010 FIFA World Cup. Br J Sports Med 2011; 45: 626-630. [11] Hägglund M, Waldén M, Ekstrand J. UEFA injury study—an injury audit of European Championships 2006 to 2008. Br J Sports Med 2009; 43: 483-489. [12] Junge A, Rösch D, Peterson L, Graf-Baumann T, Dvorak, J. Prevention of soccer injuries: a prospective intervention study in youth amateur players. Am J Sports Med 2002; 30: 652-659. [13] Le Gall F, Carling C, Reilly T, Vandewalle H, Church J, Rochcongar P. Incidence of injuries in elite French youth soccer players: a 10-season study. Am J Sports Med 2006; 34: 928-938. [14] Price RJ, Hawkins RD, Hulse MA, Hodson A. The Football Association medical research programme: an audit of injuries in academy youth football. Br J Sports Med 2004; 38: 466-471. [15] Hägglund M, Waldén M, Ekstrand J. Injuries among male and female elite football players. Scand J Med Sci Sports 2009; 19: 819-827. [16] Le Gall F, Carling C, Reilly T. Injuries in young elite female soccer players: an 8-season prospective study. Am J Sports Med 2008; 36: 276-284. [17] British University and College Sport (2013) Annual review 2011-12. [Online].http://www.bucs.org.uk/page.asp?section=9§ionTitle=About+Us [accessed 27 Feb 2014] [18] Survey Monkey (2013) Home [online].http://www.surveymonkey.com/ [Accessed on 18/4/13] [19] Baruch Y, Holtom BC. Survey response rate levels and trends in organizational research. Human Relations 2008; 61: 1139-1160. [20] Madge C, Meek J, Wellens J, Hooley T. Facebook, social integration and informal learning at university: ‘It is more for socialising and talking to friends about work than for actually doing work’. Learning, Media and Technology 2009; 34: 141-155. [21] Gabbe BJ, Finch CF, Bennell KL, Wajswelner H. How valid is a self reported 12 month sports injury history? Br J Sports Med 2003; 37: 545-547. [22] Fordham S, Garbutt G, Lopes P. Epidemiology of injuries in adventure racing athletes. Br J Sports Med 2004; 38: 300-303. [23] Vincent WJ, Weir JP. Statistics in Kinesiology, 4th edn. Human Kinetics, 2012. [24] Faude O, Junge A, Kindermann W, Dvorak J. Risk factors for injuries in elite female soccer players. Br J Sports Med 2006; 40: 785-790. [25] Rahnama N, Reilly T, Lees A. Injury risk associated with playing actions during competitive soccer. Br J Sports Med 2002; 36: 354-359. [26] Nickel C, Zernial O, Musahl V, Hansen U, Zantop T, Petersen W. A prospective study of kitesurfing injuries. Am J Sports Med 2004; 32: 921–927. [27] Hägglund M, Waldén M, Ekstrand J. Previous injury as a risk factor for injury in elite football: a prospective study over two consecutive seasons. British Journal of Sports Medicine 2006; 40: 767-772. [28] White JE, Emery TM, Kane JL, Groves R, Risman AB. Pre-season fitness profiles of professional soccer players. In: Reilly T, Lees A, Davis K, Murphy WJ. Eds. Science and football. London: E & FN Spon, 1988:164-171. [29] Fuller CW, Dick RW, Corlette J, Schmalz R. Comparison of the incidence, nature and cause of injuries sustained on grass and new generation artificial turf by male and female football players. Part 1: match injuries. Br J Sports Med 2007; 41(Suppl 1): i20-26. [30] Fuller CW, Dick RW, Corlette J, Schmalz R. Comparison of the incidence, nature and cause of injuries sustained on grass and new generation artificial turf by male and female football players. Part 2: training injuries. Br J Sports Med 2007; 41(Suppl 1): i27-32. [31] Ekstrand J, Timpka T, Hägglund M. Risk of injury in elite football played on artificial turf versus natural grass: a prospective two-cohort study. Br J Sports Med 2006; 40: 975-980. [32] Engström B, Johansson C, Tornkvist H. Soccer injuries among elite female players. Am J Sports Med 1991; 19: 372-375. [33] Arnason A, Sigurdsson SB, Gudmundsson A, Holme I, Engebretsen L, Bahr R. Risk factors for injuries in football. Am J Sports Med 2004; 32(1 suppl): 5S-16S. [34] Estwanik J, Sloane B, Rosenberg M. Groin strain and other possible causes of groin pain. Phys Sportsmed 1990; 18: 55-60. [35] Garret W. Muscle strain injuries. Am J Sports Med 1996; 24: S2-8. [36] Ekstrand J, Hilding J. The incidence and differential diagnosis of acute groin injuries in male soccer players. Scand J Med Sci Sports 1999; 9: 98-103. [37] Tyler TF, Nicholas SJ, Campbell RJ, McHugh MP. The association of hip strength and flexibility with the incidence of adductor muscle strains in professional ice hockey players. Am J Sports Med 2001; 29: 124-128. [38] Hölmich P, Uhskou P, Ulnits L, Kanstrup IL, Nielsen MB, Bjerg AM, Krogsgaard K. Effectiveness of active physical training as treatment for longstanding adductor-related groin pain in athletes: randomised trial. Lancet 1999; 353: 439-43. [39] Faude O, Junge A, Kindermann W, Dvorak J. Injuries in female soccer players: a prospective study in the German national league. Am J Sports Med 2005; 33: 1694-1700. [40] Bjordal JM, Arnly F, Hannestad B, Strand T. Epidemiology of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in soccer. Am J Sports Med 1997; 25: 341-345. [41] Clausen MB, Zebis MK, Møller M, Krustrup P, Hölmich P, Wedderkopp N, Andersen LL, Christensen KB, Thorborg K. High injury incidence in adolescent female soccer. Am J Sports Med 2014 [Ahead of print].

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - Although football is one of the most popular sports worldwide, there have been very few studies on injuries suffered at university level. The aim of this study was to collate a wide range of epidemiological findings representative of the injuries suffered by those who play football at this level; while also comparing those injuries suffered between males and females. An electronic retrospective questionnaire was completed by 183 British University level footballers (males n=99, females n=84) who had sustained an injury during the 2011-12 season. The dominant lower limb (ankle: 29.5%, knee: 19.7%) was found as the most common site of injury occurrence with sprains (36. 6%) and muscle strains (23%) reported as the most common types of injury. University players are most often exposed to risk of injury in the autumnal period (20%), whilst playing a competitive match (58.5%) on a grass surface (66.1%) and the severity of injury is high (44.8%). Males reported more groin/thigh and muscle strain injuries compared to females. This study provides a landscape of information in relation to UK university football injuries. There is a need for an injury surveillance initiative to be implemented prospectively involving team doctors and a database of players’ medical records. This, in combination with the results found in this study, will help produce a better evidence base of the epidemiology of injuries at this level which will pave the way for producing preventative strategies that aim to improve the safety of university football participation.

AB - Although football is one of the most popular sports worldwide, there have been very few studies on injuries suffered at university level. The aim of this study was to collate a wide range of epidemiological findings representative of the injuries suffered by those who play football at this level; while also comparing those injuries suffered between males and females. An electronic retrospective questionnaire was completed by 183 British University level footballers (males n=99, females n=84) who had sustained an injury during the 2011-12 season. The dominant lower limb (ankle: 29.5%, knee: 19.7%) was found as the most common site of injury occurrence with sprains (36. 6%) and muscle strains (23%) reported as the most common types of injury. University players are most often exposed to risk of injury in the autumnal period (20%), whilst playing a competitive match (58.5%) on a grass surface (66.1%) and the severity of injury is high (44.8%). Males reported more groin/thigh and muscle strain injuries compared to females. This study provides a landscape of information in relation to UK university football injuries. There is a need for an injury surveillance initiative to be implemented prospectively involving team doctors and a database of players’ medical records. This, in combination with the results found in this study, will help produce a better evidence base of the epidemiology of injuries at this level which will pave the way for producing preventative strategies that aim to improve the safety of university football participation.

KW - Football

KW - Injury

KW - Epidemiology

KW - University

U2 - 10.5923/s.sports.201401.07

DO - 10.5923/s.sports.201401.07

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 49

EP - 55

JO - International Journal of Sports Science

T2 - International Journal of Sports Science

JF - International Journal of Sports Science

SN - 2169-8759

IS - 6A

ER -