The effects of sand dune and hill running on lower limb kinematics and running speed in elite sprinters.

Andrew Harrison, Randall Jensen, Carla McCabe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the technical adaptations used by elite sprinters when running on sand dunes compared with running on a grass surface of similar gradient. Seven elite sprinters were videotaped while running at maximum effort up inclined sand and grass surfaces. Sagittal plane kinematic data were obtained using two video cameras placed on either side of the subjects. The video sequences were analysed using the Peak Motus. video analysis system. The results indicated that sand running caused reductions in running speed, stride rate, stride length and thigh range of motion. Ground contact time of the foot was increased and the relative timing of stride events was also disrupted while running on sand and this suggests a greater muscle loading effect compared with running on grass.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUnknown Host Publication
EditorsMario Lamontagne, D Gordon, E Robertson, Heidi Sveistrup
Pages87-90
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Event22nd International Symposium on Biomechanics in Sports - Ottawa, Canada
Duration: 1 Jan 2004 → …

Conference

Conference22nd International Symposium on Biomechanics in Sports
Period1/01/04 → …

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Keywords

  • Velocity
  • Technique
  • Running surface

Cite this

Harrison, A., Jensen, R., & McCabe, C. (2004). The effects of sand dune and hill running on lower limb kinematics and running speed in elite sprinters. In M. Lamontagne, D. Gordon, E. Robertson, & H. Sveistrup (Eds.), Unknown Host Publication (pp. 87-90)