The effectiveness of education and aerobic exercise in ‘high functioning’ patients with fibromyalgia: evaluation of a new service.

C Cullinane, JG McVeigh, C Sheehy, B Irundajai

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Background. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is characterised by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and reduced physical function. Exercise has positive effects on physical function, fatigue and well-being in FMS. However, patients find it difficult to engage in exercise and often have low self-efficacy for exercise.Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate a new early access service consisting of a 6-week education and aerobic exercise intervention in patients with FMS, who were classified as “high functioning”.Methods. Participants (n=32) were referred from WRH rheumatology department and attended a 6-week exercise and education intervention delivered by physiotherapist and occupational therapist. Participants completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HAD) Six-Minute-Walk Test (6MWT) and Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES). Follow up was carried out post and 3 months post programme.Results. Participants who completed the intervention had a significant improvement in mean (SD) pain from baseline 7.01 (1.8) to the end of the programme 5.6 (2.9), p=0.03. Mean (SD) 6MWT improved from 386m (96) to 416m (57) at the end of the programme (p=0.05), this was maintained at 3 month follow-up. There was no significant change in total FIQ score or the HAD scale, however, participants' exercise self-efficacy significantly improved from 58.2 (18.6) to 68 (11.6), p=0.01.Conclusions. Improvements were recorded post programme in exercise capacity, exercise self-efficacy and VAS pain. Improvement was maintained at 3 months follow up. Anticipated service developments are use of FIQ to subgroup, longer term follow up, vocational rehabilitation and pedometer use to evaluate exercise adherence.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages1201
    JournalAnnals of the Rheumatic Diseases
    Volume73
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Fibromyalgia
    Education
    Fatigue of materials
    Exercise
    Patient rehabilitation
    Self Efficacy
    Fatigue
    Anxiety
    Depression
    Vocational Rehabilitation
    Pain
    Physical Therapists
    Rheumatology
    Chronic Pain

    Keywords

    • fibromyalgia syndrome
    • patient education
    • aerobic exercise
    • physiotherapy

    Cite this

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    title = "The effectiveness of education and aerobic exercise in ‘high functioning’ patients with fibromyalgia: evaluation of a new service.",
    abstract = "Background. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is characterised by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and reduced physical function. Exercise has positive effects on physical function, fatigue and well-being in FMS. However, patients find it difficult to engage in exercise and often have low self-efficacy for exercise.Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate a new early access service consisting of a 6-week education and aerobic exercise intervention in patients with FMS, who were classified as “high functioning”.Methods. Participants (n=32) were referred from WRH rheumatology department and attended a 6-week exercise and education intervention delivered by physiotherapist and occupational therapist. Participants completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HAD) Six-Minute-Walk Test (6MWT) and Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES). Follow up was carried out post and 3 months post programme.Results. Participants who completed the intervention had a significant improvement in mean (SD) pain from baseline 7.01 (1.8) to the end of the programme 5.6 (2.9), p=0.03. Mean (SD) 6MWT improved from 386m (96) to 416m (57) at the end of the programme (p=0.05), this was maintained at 3 month follow-up. There was no significant change in total FIQ score or the HAD scale, however, participants' exercise self-efficacy significantly improved from 58.2 (18.6) to 68 (11.6), p=0.01.Conclusions. Improvements were recorded post programme in exercise capacity, exercise self-efficacy and VAS pain. Improvement was maintained at 3 months follow up. Anticipated service developments are use of FIQ to subgroup, longer term follow up, vocational rehabilitation and pedometer use to evaluate exercise adherence.",
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    The effectiveness of education and aerobic exercise in ‘high functioning’ patients with fibromyalgia: evaluation of a new service. / Cullinane, C; McVeigh, JG; Sheehy, C; Irundajai, B.

    In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, Vol. 73, No. 2, 2014, p. 1201.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The effectiveness of education and aerobic exercise in ‘high functioning’ patients with fibromyalgia: evaluation of a new service.

    AU - Cullinane, C

    AU - McVeigh, JG

    AU - Sheehy, C

    AU - Irundajai, B

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - Background. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is characterised by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and reduced physical function. Exercise has positive effects on physical function, fatigue and well-being in FMS. However, patients find it difficult to engage in exercise and often have low self-efficacy for exercise.Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate a new early access service consisting of a 6-week education and aerobic exercise intervention in patients with FMS, who were classified as “high functioning”.Methods. Participants (n=32) were referred from WRH rheumatology department and attended a 6-week exercise and education intervention delivered by physiotherapist and occupational therapist. Participants completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HAD) Six-Minute-Walk Test (6MWT) and Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES). Follow up was carried out post and 3 months post programme.Results. Participants who completed the intervention had a significant improvement in mean (SD) pain from baseline 7.01 (1.8) to the end of the programme 5.6 (2.9), p=0.03. Mean (SD) 6MWT improved from 386m (96) to 416m (57) at the end of the programme (p=0.05), this was maintained at 3 month follow-up. There was no significant change in total FIQ score or the HAD scale, however, participants' exercise self-efficacy significantly improved from 58.2 (18.6) to 68 (11.6), p=0.01.Conclusions. Improvements were recorded post programme in exercise capacity, exercise self-efficacy and VAS pain. Improvement was maintained at 3 months follow up. Anticipated service developments are use of FIQ to subgroup, longer term follow up, vocational rehabilitation and pedometer use to evaluate exercise adherence.

    AB - Background. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is characterised by chronic widespread pain, fatigue and reduced physical function. Exercise has positive effects on physical function, fatigue and well-being in FMS. However, patients find it difficult to engage in exercise and often have low self-efficacy for exercise.Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate a new early access service consisting of a 6-week education and aerobic exercise intervention in patients with FMS, who were classified as “high functioning”.Methods. Participants (n=32) were referred from WRH rheumatology department and attended a 6-week exercise and education intervention delivered by physiotherapist and occupational therapist. Participants completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HAD) Six-Minute-Walk Test (6MWT) and Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES). Follow up was carried out post and 3 months post programme.Results. Participants who completed the intervention had a significant improvement in mean (SD) pain from baseline 7.01 (1.8) to the end of the programme 5.6 (2.9), p=0.03. Mean (SD) 6MWT improved from 386m (96) to 416m (57) at the end of the programme (p=0.05), this was maintained at 3 month follow-up. There was no significant change in total FIQ score or the HAD scale, however, participants' exercise self-efficacy significantly improved from 58.2 (18.6) to 68 (11.6), p=0.01.Conclusions. Improvements were recorded post programme in exercise capacity, exercise self-efficacy and VAS pain. Improvement was maintained at 3 months follow up. Anticipated service developments are use of FIQ to subgroup, longer term follow up, vocational rehabilitation and pedometer use to evaluate exercise adherence.

    KW - fibromyalgia syndrome

    KW - patient education

    KW - aerobic exercise

    KW - physiotherapy

    U2 - 10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-eular.2931

    DO - 10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-eular.2931

    M3 - Article

    VL - 73

    SP - 1201

    JO - Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

    T2 - Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

    JF - Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

    SN - 0003-4967

    IS - 2

    ER -