The effectiveness of a storybook in lessening anxiety in children undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in northern ireland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a storybook, entitled, The Tale of Woody’s Tonsils, written by Anne Marie Tunney, on reducing the level of anxiety of children aged 5–11 years who were undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in one hospital in Northern Ireland. Background/Literature Review: Psychological preparation of children for surgery impacts coping. There is evidence, in both adult and pediatric studies, that effective psychological preparation for a surgical procedure has an impact on the individuals’ coping ability with reduced levels of anxiety leading to better post-operative outcome, faster recovery and a reduction in long term sequelae associated with admission to hospital. A storybook, as a method of preparation, has been recommended by a number of researchers but the effectiveness of this in reducing anxiety has not yet been investigated in the UK. Previous studies have mainly used only one research instrument for anxiety measurement and child self-report is not a commonly used feature of such research. Design and Methodology: A quasi-experimental study involving 80 children was conducted using a repeated measures design. Children attending a pre-assessment clinic were randomly allocated to either an experimental group (received the storybook) or a control group (did not get the storybook). Anxiety was tested both pre- and post-intervention using a self-report Hospital Fears Rating Scale and Child Drawing: Hospital, a projective technique based on children’s drawings. Findings: The storybook was found to be effective in reducing pre-operative anxiety and was found to be particularly effective for females and in the 7-year-old age group. Practice Implications; This study demonstrates the storybook’s effectiveness for alleviating anxiety and advocates the use of child focused anxiety measurement tools. It reinforces the need for pre assessment to include exploration of anxiety triggers so that preoperative preparation and nursing care can be individualized for each child.
LanguageEnglish
Pages319-335
JournalIssues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Adenoidectomy
Northern Ireland
Tonsillectomy
Anxiety
Self Report
Projective Techniques
Psychology
Preoperative Care
Aptitude
Needs Assessment
Palatine Tonsil
Nursing Care
Research
Fear
Age Groups
Research Personnel
Pediatrics
Control Groups

Cite this

@article{90e67f545bf245e0936cbec40d767533,
title = "The effectiveness of a storybook in lessening anxiety in children undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in northern ireland",
abstract = "Aim: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a storybook, entitled, The Tale of Woody’s Tonsils, written by Anne Marie Tunney, on reducing the level of anxiety of children aged 5–11 years who were undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in one hospital in Northern Ireland. Background/Literature Review: Psychological preparation of children for surgery impacts coping. There is evidence, in both adult and pediatric studies, that effective psychological preparation for a surgical procedure has an impact on the individuals’ coping ability with reduced levels of anxiety leading to better post-operative outcome, faster recovery and a reduction in long term sequelae associated with admission to hospital. A storybook, as a method of preparation, has been recommended by a number of researchers but the effectiveness of this in reducing anxiety has not yet been investigated in the UK. Previous studies have mainly used only one research instrument for anxiety measurement and child self-report is not a commonly used feature of such research. Design and Methodology: A quasi-experimental study involving 80 children was conducted using a repeated measures design. Children attending a pre-assessment clinic were randomly allocated to either an experimental group (received the storybook) or a control group (did not get the storybook). Anxiety was tested both pre- and post-intervention using a self-report Hospital Fears Rating Scale and Child Drawing: Hospital, a projective technique based on children’s drawings. Findings: The storybook was found to be effective in reducing pre-operative anxiety and was found to be particularly effective for females and in the 7-year-old age group. Practice Implications; This study demonstrates the storybook’s effectiveness for alleviating anxiety and advocates the use of child focused anxiety measurement tools. It reinforces the need for pre assessment to include exploration of anxiety triggers so that preoperative preparation and nursing care can be individualized for each child.",
author = "Anne-Marie Tunney and JRP Boore",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
doi = "10.3109/01460862.2013.834398",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "319--335",
journal = "Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing",
issn = "0146-0862",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effectiveness of a storybook in lessening anxiety in children undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in northern ireland

AU - Tunney, Anne-Marie

AU - Boore, JRP

PY - 2013/12

Y1 - 2013/12

N2 - Aim: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a storybook, entitled, The Tale of Woody’s Tonsils, written by Anne Marie Tunney, on reducing the level of anxiety of children aged 5–11 years who were undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in one hospital in Northern Ireland. Background/Literature Review: Psychological preparation of children for surgery impacts coping. There is evidence, in both adult and pediatric studies, that effective psychological preparation for a surgical procedure has an impact on the individuals’ coping ability with reduced levels of anxiety leading to better post-operative outcome, faster recovery and a reduction in long term sequelae associated with admission to hospital. A storybook, as a method of preparation, has been recommended by a number of researchers but the effectiveness of this in reducing anxiety has not yet been investigated in the UK. Previous studies have mainly used only one research instrument for anxiety measurement and child self-report is not a commonly used feature of such research. Design and Methodology: A quasi-experimental study involving 80 children was conducted using a repeated measures design. Children attending a pre-assessment clinic were randomly allocated to either an experimental group (received the storybook) or a control group (did not get the storybook). Anxiety was tested both pre- and post-intervention using a self-report Hospital Fears Rating Scale and Child Drawing: Hospital, a projective technique based on children’s drawings. Findings: The storybook was found to be effective in reducing pre-operative anxiety and was found to be particularly effective for females and in the 7-year-old age group. Practice Implications; This study demonstrates the storybook’s effectiveness for alleviating anxiety and advocates the use of child focused anxiety measurement tools. It reinforces the need for pre assessment to include exploration of anxiety triggers so that preoperative preparation and nursing care can be individualized for each child.

AB - Aim: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a storybook, entitled, The Tale of Woody’s Tonsils, written by Anne Marie Tunney, on reducing the level of anxiety of children aged 5–11 years who were undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in one hospital in Northern Ireland. Background/Literature Review: Psychological preparation of children for surgery impacts coping. There is evidence, in both adult and pediatric studies, that effective psychological preparation for a surgical procedure has an impact on the individuals’ coping ability with reduced levels of anxiety leading to better post-operative outcome, faster recovery and a reduction in long term sequelae associated with admission to hospital. A storybook, as a method of preparation, has been recommended by a number of researchers but the effectiveness of this in reducing anxiety has not yet been investigated in the UK. Previous studies have mainly used only one research instrument for anxiety measurement and child self-report is not a commonly used feature of such research. Design and Methodology: A quasi-experimental study involving 80 children was conducted using a repeated measures design. Children attending a pre-assessment clinic were randomly allocated to either an experimental group (received the storybook) or a control group (did not get the storybook). Anxiety was tested both pre- and post-intervention using a self-report Hospital Fears Rating Scale and Child Drawing: Hospital, a projective technique based on children’s drawings. Findings: The storybook was found to be effective in reducing pre-operative anxiety and was found to be particularly effective for females and in the 7-year-old age group. Practice Implications; This study demonstrates the storybook’s effectiveness for alleviating anxiety and advocates the use of child focused anxiety measurement tools. It reinforces the need for pre assessment to include exploration of anxiety triggers so that preoperative preparation and nursing care can be individualized for each child.

U2 - 10.3109/01460862.2013.834398

DO - 10.3109/01460862.2013.834398

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 319

EP - 335

JO - Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing

T2 - Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing

JF - Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing

SN - 0146-0862

IS - 4

ER -