The effect of pressurized and fast stabilization on one step batch foaming process for the investigation of cell structure formation

M. Mokhtari Motameni Shirvan, M. H.N. Famili, M. Soltani Alkuh, A. Golbang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Control of cell structure during pressure drop is essential for the investigation of cell formation mechanism. In this work, a one step batch foaming setup was totally redesigned to stabilize foam structure at initial stages of cell forming during and after depressurization as a novel idea. The saturation pressure, duration of pressure drop and foaming temperatures were 18.5 MPa, 100 ms and 70, 90, 110 °C, respectively. The shortest stabilized foaming time was 5 ms and the longest was 5000 ms. For comparison purposes non-stabilized samples were also produced. It was concluded that the effect of stabilization on foam morphology is dependent on the foaming temperature. Foam structure at foaming temperatures of 70°C did not change with change of foaming time significantly. Foam structure at foaming temperatures of 110°C for the shortest and the longest foaming times changed from 90 μm to 170 μm and 7E + 06 cell/cm3 to 8E + 06 cell/cm3.

LanguageEnglish
Pages143-152
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Supercritical Fluids
Volume112
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Dec 2015

Fingerprint

foaming
Foams
Stabilization
stabilization
cells
foams
Pressure drop
Temperature
pressure drop
temperature
pressure reduction
saturation

Keywords

  • Cell forming mechanism
  • Depressurization
  • Morphology
  • Nucleation
  • Stabilization

Cite this

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abstract = "Control of cell structure during pressure drop is essential for the investigation of cell formation mechanism. In this work, a one step batch foaming setup was totally redesigned to stabilize foam structure at initial stages of cell forming during and after depressurization as a novel idea. The saturation pressure, duration of pressure drop and foaming temperatures were 18.5 MPa, 100 ms and 70, 90, 110 °C, respectively. The shortest stabilized foaming time was 5 ms and the longest was 5000 ms. For comparison purposes non-stabilized samples were also produced. It was concluded that the effect of stabilization on foam morphology is dependent on the foaming temperature. Foam structure at foaming temperatures of 70°C did not change with change of foaming time significantly. Foam structure at foaming temperatures of 110°C for the shortest and the longest foaming times changed from 90 μm to 170 μm and 7E + 06 cell/cm3 to 8E + 06 cell/cm3.",
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The effect of pressurized and fast stabilization on one step batch foaming process for the investigation of cell structure formation. / Shirvan, M. Mokhtari Motameni; Famili, M. H.N.; Alkuh, M. Soltani; Golbang, A.

In: Journal of Supercritical Fluids, Vol. 112, 03.12.2015, p. 143-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Shirvan, M. Mokhtari Motameni

AU - Famili, M. H.N.

AU - Alkuh, M. Soltani

AU - Golbang, A.

PY - 2015/12/3

Y1 - 2015/12/3

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AB - Control of cell structure during pressure drop is essential for the investigation of cell formation mechanism. In this work, a one step batch foaming setup was totally redesigned to stabilize foam structure at initial stages of cell forming during and after depressurization as a novel idea. The saturation pressure, duration of pressure drop and foaming temperatures were 18.5 MPa, 100 ms and 70, 90, 110 °C, respectively. The shortest stabilized foaming time was 5 ms and the longest was 5000 ms. For comparison purposes non-stabilized samples were also produced. It was concluded that the effect of stabilization on foam morphology is dependent on the foaming temperature. Foam structure at foaming temperatures of 70°C did not change with change of foaming time significantly. Foam structure at foaming temperatures of 110°C for the shortest and the longest foaming times changed from 90 μm to 170 μm and 7E + 06 cell/cm3 to 8E + 06 cell/cm3.

KW - Cell forming mechanism

KW - Depressurization

KW - Morphology

KW - Nucleation

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