The effect of low-dose fish oil supplementation on serum growth factors in healthy humans

Julie Wallace, AJ McCabe, HM Roche, S Higgins, PJ Robson, WS Gilmore, H McGlynn, JJ Strain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effect of low-dose fish oil supplementation on specific growth factors, purported to play a central role in lesion formation, and also on the total growth factor activity of serum, as assessed by the induction of DNA synthesis in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells. Design: Randomized placebo-controlled double-blind intervention study. Setting: Free-living population. Subjects: Sixty-three healthy volunteers, 37 males and 26 females. Interventions: Four treatment regimes with subjects receiving 0, 0.3, 0.6 or 0.9 g/day of n-3 PUFA for an 8 week period. Blood samples were taken at baseline and following the 8 week intervention. All samples were analysed in batch following completion of the study. Results: Consumption of fish oil had no effect on serum platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), or transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) concentration. Furthermore, fish oil supplementation did not alter the total growth factor activity of serum. Conclusions: Results indicate that low-dose fish oil supplementation, equivalent to about two portions of fatty fish per week and providing less than Ig n-3 PUFA/day, does not alter the levels of the major serum grow rh factors and does not modify total serum growth factor activity in healthy human volunteers.
LanguageEnglish
Pages690-694
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume54
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2000

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Fish Oils
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Serum
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Healthy Volunteers
Rh-Hr Blood-Group System
Platelet-Derived Growth Factor
Double-Blind Method
Transforming Growth Factor beta
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Fishes
Placebos
DNA
Population

Cite this

Wallace, J., McCabe, AJ., Roche, HM., Higgins, S., Robson, PJ., Gilmore, WS., ... Strain, JJ. (2000). The effect of low-dose fish oil supplementation on serum growth factors in healthy humans. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 54(9), 690-694.
Wallace, Julie ; McCabe, AJ ; Roche, HM ; Higgins, S ; Robson, PJ ; Gilmore, WS ; McGlynn, H ; Strain, JJ. / The effect of low-dose fish oil supplementation on serum growth factors in healthy humans. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2000 ; Vol. 54, No. 9. pp. 690-694.
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Wallace, J, McCabe, AJ, Roche, HM, Higgins, S, Robson, PJ, Gilmore, WS, McGlynn, H & Strain, JJ 2000, 'The effect of low-dose fish oil supplementation on serum growth factors in healthy humans', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 54, no. 9, pp. 690-694.

The effect of low-dose fish oil supplementation on serum growth factors in healthy humans. / Wallace, Julie; McCabe, AJ; Roche, HM; Higgins, S; Robson, PJ; Gilmore, WS; McGlynn, H; Strain, JJ.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 54, No. 9, 09.2000, p. 690-694.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Wallace J, McCabe AJ, Roche HM, Higgins S, Robson PJ, Gilmore WS et al. The effect of low-dose fish oil supplementation on serum growth factors in healthy humans. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2000 Sep;54(9):690-694.